Feminist Theory Essays (Examples)

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Theories of Domestic Violence

Words: 375 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86633024

Behind Closed Doors: Domestic Violence

The documentary Behind Closed Doors depicts several cases of domestic violence. In all of the anecdotes, women struggle to leave their abusive partners but due to personal and legal factors this is challenging. Some of the women are still in love with their abusers and return to them, despite the pervasive pattern of violence in the couple’s life together. Other times, even when men are constrained by the legal system, the men’s punishments are relatively minor, such as a sentence of only two months in prison. Coercive Control Theory helps to better explain some of the women’s seemingly inexplicable behavior, namely the idea that women’s disempowerment in society causes them to believe that their lives mean nothing unless they are attached to a male figure (Arnold 2009). Domestic violence is an assertion of male power and masculinity, according to the theory, not simply personal acts…… [Read More]

References

Behind closed doors. (2016). YouTube. Retrieved from:

http://youtu.be/YZS1JSwBNKM. 

Arnold, Gretchen. (2009). A battered women’s movement perspective of coercive control.

Violence Against Women, 15(12), 1432-1443

Lawson, J. J. (2012). Sociological theories of intimate partner violence. Journal of Human

Behavior in the Social Environment, 22(5), 572-590.




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Feminist Reading Two Models of

Words: 2840 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75727939

As such, she fails to address the central problem of feminism in the Pontellier perspective, namely the impossibility of female individuality and independence in a patriarchal world. It is only in isolation that Edna can find any happiness, and she must make this isolation more and more complete in order to maintain her happiness, as the patriarchy has a means of encroaching on all populated areas, and Wollstonecraft's feminism does not offer an alternative to this need to escape humanity.

A final snort of disgust might be distinctly heard from Edna Pontellier upon her reading of this line of Wollstonecraft's, afterwards she might likely have flung the text aside (or into the fireplace, depending on the season): "Pleasure is the business of woman's life, according to the present modification of society" (ch. 4, par. 10). What Wollstonecraft means is that women are thought to be so fragile, so emotional, and…… [Read More]

References

Chopin, Kate. The Awakening. 1899. University of Virginia E-Text Center. Accessed 28 May 2012. http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/ChoAwak.html

Hammer, Colleen. To Be Equal or Not to Be Equal: The Struggle for Women's Rights as Argued by Mary Wollstonecraft and Christina Rossetti. UCC [working paper].

Heilmann, Ann. The Awakening and New Woman cition.

Horner, Avril. Kate Chopin, choice and modernism.
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Feminist Thought Bristor J M & Fischer E

Words: 508 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12000005

Feminist Thought

Bristor, J.. & Fischer, E. (1993). Feminist thought: Implications for consumer research. The journal of consumer research,19(4), 518-536.

Bristor and Fischer (1993) suggest that consumer research has long misrepresented women and that, because of the distortion of thoughts, it is up to feminist theorists to reorganize and critique consumer research in order to make sense of the way that it has been gendered. By attempting to reappraise and revise, a difficult task given that many perspectives that are biased are unconscious, a newfound sensitivity and fairness can be applied to consumer research theory in regards to the representation of women. The article, in shedding light on the issue, summarizes some of the major areas of feminist thought and then uses that information in order to locate biases that live deep within the major understandings of science.

ethodology: Bristor and Fischer (1993) apply three unique feminist perspectives to assess…… [Read More]

Methodology: Catterall, Maclaran and Stevens (2005) engage in a brief overview of research on gender and consumer behavior. They then discuss how postmodern and postfeminist perspectives have weakened feminism as a critique of gendered consumption. The authors then set forth a case for why a return to "materialist feminism" (2005) would set the stage for original -- and more significant -- examinations of gendered consumption.

Key findings: Catterall, Maclaran and Stevens (2005) find that while feminist perspectives on consumer behavior played an important part in feminist perspectives on consumer behavior in the 1990s, those same critical perspectives appear to be lessening. The authors identify several topics that have been neglected when it comes to production, reproduction and consumption within consumer research. All of these areas would benefit by taking a more critical feminist approach to the topics.

Contributions: The authors note that critique from many different critical perspectives is necessary in our culture of consumption because there needs to be more challenging of basic assumptions and theories -- especially related to gender/sex -- when it comes to consumer research.
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Feminist Diversity Women's Liberation With

Words: 1428 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41534872

Interestingly, the Politics of Passion proves that just the opposite is true. Women who reject traditional paradigms also reject Western idealisms about sexuality, marriage, families, desire and identity. Through their sexual activities, the mati women described by Wekker embody each of these elements, and liberate themselves sexuality, which in turn leads to greater power, greater autonomy and greater independence. Women are encouraged in this environment to rely on their own instincts, knowledge and expertise to do what they feel is best for them. They are encouraged, contrary to what most women experience, to do what makes them feel good. In this way they escape the chains that bind and subordinate many women living in other cultures who are brought up to believe gender distinctions exist and women have certain responsibilities and places.

If one were to adopt the mati perspective and apply it to their life, they would find that…… [Read More]

References

Beagan, Brenda. (2001). Micro inequities and everyday inequalities: "Race," gender, sexuality and class in medical school. Canadian Journal of Sociology, 26(4): 583.

Wekker, Gloria. (2006). Politics of Passion. New York: Columbia University Press.

Power of Passion
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Feminist Point Critique of Feminism

Words: 2882 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74183878

" Cultural and social differences, then, between men and women are not so much reflections of differing social roles and expectations as they are reflections of basic genetic differences between men and women..." (Groenhout 51)

3.1. The family

To understand this criticism of feminism and the reaction to the attack on female domesticity, one has to know something about the background that initiated this reaction. This refers especially to the view of the family as a valued institution central to the structure of society that is in decline throughout the world.

A number or critics note how the feminist view and the "new" role of women in society has negatively affected the family. This has resulted as well in many feminists turning against the more radical views of feminism as they feel that they endanger the integrity of the family and family life. As one critic notes, "From the early…… [Read More]

Bibliography www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001258482

Abrams, Kathryn. "From Autonomy to Agency: Feminist Perspectives on Self-Direction." William and Mary Law Review 40.3 (1999): 805. Questia. 14 Nov. 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001258482.

Kozol W. Fracturing Domesticity: Media, Nationalism, and the Question of Feminist Influence. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 20, no. 3, 1995.

A www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002286596

Benedict, Helen. "Fear of Feminism." The Nation 11 May 1998: 10. Questia. 14 Nov. 2008 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002286596.
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Feminist Interpretation of Aristotle and

Words: 3381 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4904586



Aristotle believed that human flourishing (NE: 12) is the definition of good. The mere presence of women in Congress suggests that voters rejected a man, but it is better to look at this not as the rejection of one (male or not), but as the result of human flourishing. This increased competition of more women pursuing what they feel is their own responsibility will result in more unemployment for men, a notion bolstered by Mill's belief that, "hoever succeeds in an overcrowded profession or in a competitive examination…reaps benefits from the loss of others" (Mill; Hirshman p. 239). This could be viewed as human flourishing, which is good, but it connotes competition and struggle and doesn't make the pursuit seem virtuous. Aristotle, if following his own ethics in the world today, would have to believe that women are where they are because of human flourishing and their pursuit of what…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Curzer, Howard J. "Aristotle: Founder of the Ethics of Care." The Journal of Value Inquiry.

2007. 41:221-243.

Elshtain, Jean Bethke. Women, Militarism, and War: Essays in History, Politics, and Social

Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. 1990.
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Feminist Therapy and Postmodern Approaches

Words: 1662 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21054697

A teen might be asked to tell their own story from the point-of-view of other people they know, looking at themselves from other viewpoints. These clients are freed to invent stories and play parts in that serve the purpose of providing a framework of meaning and direction for themselves. The stories are never singled out as "true" or "false," but a recognition that truth is complex and no one story can encompass all of the truth aids the client in seeing him or herself as a complex and meaningful role-player. And in that context, since one story may not be claimed to be the whole truth, no one story may not dominate a person's life. Life, to the client and narrator of these "stories" becomes an adventure in which trials are meant to be overcome and designed to prepare one for the future, rather than to defeat. The religious story…… [Read More]

References

Brown, Laura S. Feminist Therapy, Part of the Systems of Psychotherapy, APA Psychotherapy Video Series (2006)

Brown, L.S. (1994). Subversive dialogues: Theory in feminist therapy. New York: Basic Books.

Bruner, J. (1986) Actual Minds, Possible Worlds, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Dutton-Douglas, M.A., & Walker, L.E.A. (Eds.). (1988). Feminist psychotherapies: Integration of therapeutic and feminist systems. Norwood NJ: Ablex Publishing.
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Feminist Evaluation Understanding Research & Research Methods

Words: 713 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38571049

Feminist Evaluation

Understanding esearch & esearch Methods in Social Work

Feminist evaluation: An evaluation of the conceptual framework

According to ebecca M. Beardsley and Michelle Hughes Miller's 2002 article "evisioning the process: A case study in feminist program evaluation," feminist program evaluations are based upon three core principles. The first principle is cooperation, namely that all relevant stakeholders must be considered when setting the standards for evaluation, not simply the program designers. The second is one of a lack of hierarchy -- the evaluation team members are all regarded as equal partners. Thirdly, the program must be evaluated from the ideological perspective of feminism. Although this final standard might seem unrealistic to use in program evaluation in anything buy a woman-oriented program, such as the program targeting females in the article, Beardsley and Miller point out that the majority of consumers of social services are female. The authors believe that…… [Read More]

References

Beardsley, Rebecca M. & Michelle Hughes Miller. (2002). Revisioning the process: A case study in feminist program evaluation. New Directions for Evaluation. 96: 57.

Hood, Denice Ward & Denice A. Cassaro. (2002). Feminist evaluation and the inclusion of difference: Revisioning the process: A case study in feminist program evaluation.

New Directions for Evaluation. 96: 27.

Sielbeck-Bowen, Kathryn A. Sharon Brisolara, Denise Seigart, Camille Tischler, Elizabeth
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Feminist Reading of Austen's Persuasion I Will

Words: 2126 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93736056

Feminist Reading of Austen's Persuasion

"I Will Not Allow ooks to Prove Anything":

Women Reading and Women Writing in Austen's Persuasion

Feminist criticism is equally concerned with female authorship and with female readership and in the case of Jane Austen, both issues must be addressed. Frantz in 2009 noted that on one level Austen's influence on female readership has been immense: she claims that "readers and authors of contemporary romance claim Jane Austen as the fountainhead of all romance novels," a genre which constituted the "largest share of the consumer market in 2008" but which is assumed to have an exclusively female readership. Yet feminist criticism of the early novel overall has begun to focus specifically on the rationale offered for novel-reading in the eighteenth century, when the printer's apprentice Samuel Richardson wrote Pamela in imitation of what Jenny Davidson describes as "conduct manuals," or books of etiquette for female…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Austen, Henry. "A Memoir of Jane Austen." A Memoir of Jane Austen and Other Family Recollections. Ed. Kathryn Sutherland. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 147-154. Print.

Austen, Jane. Mansfield Park. New Jersey: Gramercy Books, 1981. Print.

Austen, Jane. Persuasion. Project Gutenberg. Web.

Davidson, Jenny. Hypocrisy and the Politics of Politeness: Manners and Morals from Locke to Austen. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Print.
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Sociological Theories Sociology of Gender

Words: 1087 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29285085

Sociology and Feminist Theories on Gender Studies

Postmodern Feminism in "Cherrie Moraga and Chicana Lesbianism"

In the article entitled, "Cherrie Moraga and Chicana Lesbianism," author Tomas Almaguer analyzes and studies the dynamics behind Moraga's feminist reading of the Chicano culture and society that she originated from. In the article, Almaguer focuses on three elements that influenced Moraga's social reality as she was growing up: the powerful effect of the Chicano culture, patriarchal orientation, and homosexuality that she experienced within the context of her nationality.

Chicano culture centers on race as an indicator of one's cultural orientation, while patriarchy serves as the ideology that is prevalent in Moraga's social reality. Homosexuality, particularly, lesbianism, is Moraga's release from the somewhat repressing role that she perceives women receive in her culture. Thus, lesbianism becomes Moraga's alternative sexual orientation to a heterosexually conservative Chicano culture. Using the following factors concerning the cultural, social, and…… [Read More]

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Educational Theory and Philosophy in

Words: 5040 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21973033

Nearing the end of the 1960s, the analytic or language philosophy became the central focus point which led to the isolation of the classroom setting and the problems that came with it (Greene, 2000).

Most of the educational philosophers of the time were inclined towards restricting themselves to the official aspects and problems like the sovereignty of the system without any influence from the society and the surrounding environment and the assessment of the calls and school structure conducted for its growth or for the progression of the epistemology that it embodied (Greene, 2000).

All those setups that seemed to be coming across as invasive or seemed to add a personalized bias where it didn't belong were quickly identified and removed. This was one of the reasons that led to the obsession of the possible consequences that could exist due to the practicality of the philosophical theories. Inflexibility was adeptly…… [Read More]

References

Aleman, a.M. (1999). Que Culpa Tengo Yo? Performing Identity and College Teaching. Educational Theory 49, no. 1: 37-52;

Arons, S. (1984). Playing Ball with the Rodriguez Court: Three Strikes and You're Out. Educational Theory 34, no. 1: 23-27.

Brameld, T. et al., (1952). Existentialism and Education. Educational Theory 2, no. 2.

Buchmann, M. (1987). Impractical Philosophizing about Teachers' Arguments. Educational Theory 37, no. 4: 361-411.
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Five Approaches and Theory

Words: 1259 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63575368

ole of Theory in Qualitative esearch

Five Approaches and Theory

Compare and contrast the role of theory in the five main qualitative approaches:

Ethnography, case study, narrative, phenomenology, grounded theory

Although all five major approaches to qualitative research embrace theory to some degree or another, not all of them value the use of theory to the same degree. Broadly speaking, some cultural 'theory' is usually demonstrated within an ethnography, either through a comparative approach; an attempt to understand the culture on its own terms; a theory that seeks to understand the multiple layers of meaning within the culture in a symbolic fashion; or even a universalizing construct like feminist or Marxist theory. The extent to which this theoretical approach is emphasized will depend upon the anthropologist conducting the study. Some studies may mainly focus upon observations and detail unique aspects of a foreign culture while other studies might largely subsume…… [Read More]

References

Ethnography. (2013). Colorado State University Writing Guides. Retrieved:

http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1345

Grounded theory. (2013). Colorado State University Writing Guides. Retrieved:

http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1349
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Sociological Theories Have Helped Widen People's Scope

Words: 1548 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10234738

Sociological theories have helped widen people's scope on social behaviors and societies. In fact, the study of sociological theories makes one develop a comprehensive understanding of sociology's past, present and future. There are a number of sociological theories namely: symbolic interaction theory, conflict theory, functionalist theory, feminist theory, critical theory, labeling theory, social learning theory, and structural strain theory among others (Giddens, 1997).

Government, religion, education, economics and family are some of the five major social institutions that have been there for quite some time. This term paper seeks to evaluate the impacts of functionalism, conflict, and interaction theories on the family institution. The paper will address how each of the theories apply to the family as a social institution; the similarities and differences that exist; how each theory affects the views of an individual who is a member of the family unit; how each of the theories affect approach…… [Read More]

References List

Giddens, A. (1997). Sociology. Cambridge: Polity.

McLennan, G, Allanah, R., & Spoonley, P. (2000). Exploring society: Sociology

for New Zealand students. Auckland: Pearson.

Stephens, P., & Leach, A. (1998). Think Sociology. New York: Nelson Thornes.
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sociology article and how it relates to a theory

Words: 1877 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53751077

Gallant, J. (2016). Alleged sex abuse victim's fight for justice turns into bureaucratic nightmare. Toronto Star. 2 Dec, 2016. Retrieved online: http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2016/12/02/alleged-sex-abuse-victims-fight-for-justice-turns-into-bureaucratic-nightmare.html

In this article, Gallant (2016) describes the ongoing legal battle between Sveta Kholi and her former neurologist, Paul O'Connor. Kholi has accused O'Connor of sexual abuse. After the complaint was lodged formally, a complex bureaucratic process ensued whereby the entire case appears to have been stalemated. The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario has a committee that formally handles complaints, and the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board (HPARB) is a civilian body that hears appeals specifically from that very same College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario.

However, the bureaucratic complications become even trickier. According to the journalist, the College of Physicians and Surgeons also has an Inquiries, Complaints and Reports Committee. The HPARB has ordered on two separate occasions for the Inquiries, Complaints, and Reports…… [Read More]

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Feminism Heaney and Dickinson Feminist

Words: 380 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76683429

Because society compromises the value of the woman, it is allowed the life of domesticity and life. The speaker however remains forever beyond this because she chooses self-realization instead.

In Heaney's "Punishment," feminism can be seen from the male viewpoint, as it were. The corpse of a bog girl, an adulteress, educates the narrator regarding issues of gender and politics. The narrator, far from the conventional male reaction of disgust, instead becomes infatuated with her. It is as if he is the male representative of the feminist viewpoint; that women offer value and education rather than objects of sex or symbols of domesticity. The intimacy between the speakers involve no blame. Instead of man and woman, they are equals, in strong contrast with the society that would condemn them both for their actions and their association.

ources

Academy of American Poets. A Close Reading of "I Cannot Live With You."…… [Read More]

Sources

Academy of American Poets. A Close Reading of "I Cannot Live With You." 2007. http://www.poets.org/page.php/prmID/310

Tagle, Stephen. The Bog Girl Re-sexualized: An Analysis of Seamus Heaney's "Punishment." 13 April, 2005. http://www.stanford.edu/~stagle/ESSAYS/SPR%20ENG160%20E01%20Punishment.htm
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Rct Relational Cultural Theory as

Words: 2229 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4486894

RCT believes that everyone desires growth and that growth is by necessity connective in relational and cultural links. Mutual empathy and mutual empowerment foster these relationships in positive ways. (Jordan, "The role of mutual")

Sigmund Freud and Erik Erickson may arguably be two of the most influential icons in the field of human development and psychology. Their fundamental concept that human's develop over a lifetime and not just in a few stages from birth to adolescence and then are frozen into psychological patterns, revolutionized thinking in the field of developmental psychology. The term Life Span Development came to the fore as Erickson devised his eight stages of psychosocial development ranging from birth to eighty years old. Later as he himself passed eighty he realized that there is yet another stage and the count became nine. (Erikson & Erikson, 1997) One can see the striking resemblance between Erickson and Freud's stages…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Comstock, Dana L., et al. "Relational-Cultural Theory: A Framework for Bridging Relational, Multicultural, and Social Justice Competencies." Journal of Counseling and Development 86.3 (2008): 279-288.

Crethar, Hugh C., Edil Torres Rivera, and Sara Nash. "In Search of Common Threads: Linking Multicultural, Feminist, and Social Justice Counseling Paradigms." Journal of Counseling and Development 86.3 (2008): 269-276

Erikson, E.H. & Erikson, J. M . The Life Cycle Completed / Extended Version. New York:

W.W. Norton. 1997
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Film Theory

Words: 2093 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29431991

Film Theory

The canonical model of the purely cinematic (Eisenstein, Kracauer, Bazin) starts disappearing in contemporary theory. Most film theorists since the 1970s (Baudry, Wollen, Mulvey, Stam/Shohat, or Jameson, etc.) Explain in different ways how the textual (content and form, the film text itself) and institutional have merged together. Choose two theorists for whom the institutional issues are integrally connected to the textual ones, and explain their insights about reading cinema.

Laura Mulvey's piece, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" is divided into three sections. The first section is the introduction, the next section is called "Pleasure in Looking: Fascination with the Human Form." The third section is called "Woman as Image, Man as Bearer of the Look," which is followed by a summary of the entire work. Mulvey makes numerous assertions in her work, but one of her primary intentions of "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" is to call serious,…… [Read More]

References:

Diawara, M. 1993. Noir by Noirs: Towards a New Realism in Black Cinema. African-American Review, 27(4), 525 -- 537.

Hooks, B. 1991. Micheaux: Celebrating Blackness. Black American Literature Forum: Black Film Issue, 25(2), 351 -- 360.

Hooks, B. 1992. The Oppositional Gaze: Black Female Spectators. Black Looks: Race and Representation. South End Press, Boston.

Mulvey, L. 2004. Beyond the Gaze: Recent Approaches to Film Feminisms -- Special Issue. Signs, 30(1), 1286 -- 000.
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Social Bonding Theory

Words: 1686 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14253591

Travis Hirschi's Social Bonding Theory

The theorist, Hirschi, asserts that those who exhibit deviant behavior desire to do so and that criminal behavior is seen among people with weak social bonds. In his social bonding model, he delineated four elements which make up social bonds, namely, attachment to partner/spouse, engagement in conforming behaviors, holding conventional beliefs and values, and dedication to conventionality (Wolfzorn, Heckert & Heckert, 2006). The theorist indicates that with increased attachment of a person to fellow human beings, their belief in conformist social values will increase. Furthermore, with increased investment and involvement in conventional activity, their propensity to deviate will decrease (Chriss, 2007).
 

Four Elements of Social Bonding Theory

Social bonding has four elements, namely: attachment, involvement, belief, and commitment.

The first component -- attachment -- denotes individuals' ties to their spouses or partners, and other members of the family. This aspect encompasses the extent of…… [Read More]

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Psychology Objectification Theory Refers to

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9093480



Third, certain circumstances are more likely to prompt self-objectification than others. These experiments confirmed that trying on a swimsuit is one of these circumstances. This circumstance appears to lead to a sense of being on display even though no actual observers were present. Data from the manipulation check suggested that wearing the swimsuit reduced the person's to feeling that they were nothing more than their body. Trying on swimwear led females to feel embarrassment and repulsion, while this identical circumstance led men to experience bashful and ridiculous thoughts. Shame has been thought to a failure to obtain moral standards. The researchers interpreted the increased shame felt by women as representing the increased cultural strains put on women to adhere to physical beauty standards.

Inducing state self-objectification also reduced math performance only for women, which was consistent with the prediction, that self objectification consume mental assets. The performance decrement established here…… [Read More]

References

Fredrickson, Barbara L. (1998). That swimsuit Becomes You: Sex Differences in Self-

Objectification, Restrained Eating, and Math Performance. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75(1), pg. 269-284.
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Rebecca From a Feminist Standpoint

Words: 1503 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72179572

Most people who knew ebecca knew that she was beautiful, charming, and wealthy. Most people did not know her feelings of self-loathing, anger, and wishing for death. Maxim de Winter accommodates her by supplying her a decadent lifestyle, by catering to her every whim, even by murdering her -- she tempts and pushes him to fulfill her wishes: to end her life. She has terminal cancer and numerous affairs. Mrs. Danvers honors and accommodates ebecca with convergence with every breath; she accommodates the second Mrs. de Winter with divergence between her and ebecca. Mrs. de Winter spends the novel obsessed with ebecca -- who she was, and desires very much to be just like her. The only action taken that does not accommodate ebecca and is severely divergent, is the burning of the mansion, Manderley, and the de Winters fleeing after the fire. As for the future communication behaviors of…… [Read More]

References

du Maurier, D. (1938) Rebecca. Doubleday & Company, Inc., New York, New York.
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Dissecting Criminal Labelling Theory Howard

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45508346

Thus, even "victimless" deviant activities are regulated through various methods of formal and informal control. The deviancy ascribed to Brenda's teen pregnancy, for example, stems largely from the way she challenges the norms regarding sexual behavior. Conflict theorists believe that laws and norms do not reflect values of society as a whole, but only of the dominant segment.

Similarly, it could be said that Brenda's drug habit is a victimless crime. If she pursues reasonable precautions, such as avoiding driving and staying in a private place, her drug use does not differ much from smoking or alcohol consumption. However, since drug use is frowned upon by the social elite, Brenda is seen as a criminal.

Feminist theory

Similar to conflict and Marxist theories, feminist theorists see much social inequity in society.

This social inequity is one that divides the sexes. Early on in Brenda's life, the loss of job of…… [Read More]

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Multicultural Theories

Words: 851 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26631217

Multicultural therapies like ethnic family therapy recognize the multiple worldviews and diversity of values among clientele. Moreover, multicultural therapies avoid problems associated with decontextualization and the ignorance of politics and power structures in people's lives (Comas-Diaz, 2014). Therapists working in a diverse environment do need to develop cultural competence to serve their communities. Cultural competence requires self-awareness and recognition of one's own worldview, biases, and attitudes. Likewise, cultural competence leads to effective means of helping people whose worldviews and backgrounds are different from the therapist. Without branching too much into related social sciences like sociology, anthropology, and social work, multicultural psychological therapies do draw from other disciplines in order to form a more cohesive vision of cultural competence. No person develops in isolation of his or her culture or background. Therefore, it is critical to include dynamics of oppression, experiences of racism or stigma, issues related to the immigrant experience,…… [Read More]

Reference

Comas-Diaz, L. (2014). Multicultural theories of psychotherapy. In Corsini, R.J. & Wedding, D. Current psychotherapies (10th ed.). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning.
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Relational Theory

Words: 1926 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70142966

elational Theory

Assumptions and Implications of the elational Theory

elational theory aligns with traditional views of social work. This theory has special significance on relationships and the settings that women attest to. In the recent times, researchers and psychologist have perceived the dissimilarities in mental development between men and women (Saari, 2005). A key conclusion is that women strongly emphasize on relationships whereas men lay emphasis on individuation (Quinn and Grumbach, 2015). One of the main assumptions of the relational theory is the intrinsically and innately social nature of human beings. Based on the belief that people are socially founded and instituted by associations, relational theory seeks to understand the complication behind the formation of relationships (Mccauley, 2013). In particular, the relational theory puts forward that the relational nature of us as human beings' steers and instigates us to grow and develop through and in the direction of connection. As…… [Read More]

References

Comstock, D. L., Hammer, T. R., Strentzsch, J., Cannon, K., Parsons, J., & II, G. S. (2008). Relational-cultural theory: A framework for bridging relational, multicultural, and social justice competencies. Journal of Counseling & Development, 86(3), 279-287.

Firestone, L. (2013). How Your Attachment Style Impacts Your Relationship: What is your attachment style? Psychology Today.

McCauley, M. (2013). Relational-Cultural Theory: Fostering Healthy Coexistence Through a Relational Lens. Beyond Intractability. Retrieved from:  http://www.beyondintractability.org/essay/relational-cultural-theory 

Quinn, C. R., &Grumbach, G. (2015). Critical Race Theory and the Limits of Relational Theory in Social Work with Women. Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work, 24(3), 202-218.
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Feminist Rhetorical Theory Women Have Been Historically

Words: 1656 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92460615

feminist rhetorical theory. omen have been historically minimized and isolated by the domination of the patriarchal majority. Although women have been able to make a degree of progress, finally achieving positions of social and political power, the number of women in these high offices is still far less than the roles that are filled by man. Modern women, far removed from the "angels in the house" of the Victorian age, are nonetheless still impacted by the sociological oppression of women which was reinforced during that era, according to the rhetorical theory of feminism. Given that this is the case, men and women need to be aware of these underlying gender biases so that they can both combat them and make sure that they themselves do not fall prey to them. People who deny that this subjugation of women may be enlightened by closer examination of the power dynamics which exists…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cixous, H., Cohen, K, & Cohen, P. (1976). The laugh of the Medusa. Signs. 1(4). The University

of Chicago Press: Chicago, IL. 875-93.

Foss, S. & Griffin, C. (2003). Beyond persuasion: a proposal for an invitational rhetoric.

Communications Monographs. 2-18.
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Theory Help You to Make Sense of

Words: 3357 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34639519

Theory Help You to Make Sense of Your Own Organization and the Management Practices in Your Organization?

Too often, individuals get an idea stuck in their heads and they cannot dislodge it no matter how hard they try. In actuality though, most people who can only contrive a particular system for working, whether that be managing or running an organization, and there is no interest in change. I realize that falling back to a secure position is comforting, but it is also damaging from a growth standpoint. And, growth is the object in business; that is, aside from the fact that making money is probably the primary concern.

But making money has led to some troubling consequences in the world as businesses have grown greedy and managers have become overly authoritarian and sure of their stagnant methods. The reality is that "managing and organizing are not isolatable objects of study…… [Read More]

References

Akella, D., (2008). A reflection on critical management studies. Journal of Management and Organization, 14(1), 100-109.

Bourn, D. (2011). Global skills: From economic competitiveness to cultural understanding and critical pedagogy. Critical Literacy: Theory & Practice, 6(1), 3- 20.

Das, H., & Long, B.S., (2010). What makes management research interesting?: An exploratory study. Journal of Managerial Issues, 22(1), 127-140.

Delbecq, A.L., (1999). Rethinking management education. Administrative Science Quarterly, 44(2), 439-442.
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Feminist Epistemology Are Consistent Within the Values

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44844583

Feminist Epistemology Are Consistent Within the Values of My Professional Discipline

Education as a profession is intensely self-reflective. There is a constant need to ask 'what is the purpose of learning' and 'what makes an individual educated in our society.' Currently, the nation is wrestling with this question in the era of No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Schools are being judged as 'successes' and failures based upon predetermined standards. But this is not a new debate. Ever since Plato people have debated what individuals are teachable and the role of the state in educating young people. Critical theory helps to contextualize the debate about the nature of human intelligence and what constitutes an acceptable canon of knowledge. For example, during the 19th century for upper-class boys, knowing Greek and Latin rather than technical disciplines was prized. Today, the sciences are given priority in judging educational excellence, such as the sciences…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, Elizabeth. (2000). Feminist epistemology. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Retrieved May 23, 2011 at  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/feminism-epistemology/
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Feminist Advocacy of a Social Issue in Contemporary Culture

Words: 1979 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12426002

Post-Feminist Society

Contemporary Feminist Advocacy

Although there is not absolute consensus, popular writings about feminism suggest that there have been three waves of feminism: (1) The first wave of feminism is said to have occurred in the 18th through the 20th centuries and was characterized by a focus on suffrage; (2) The decades spanning 1960 to 1990 are said to encompass the second wave of feminism, to which a concern with cultural and legal gender inequality is attributed; and (3) The third wave of feminism began in the early 1990s partly in response to the conservative backlash the second wave engendered, and partly in recognition of the unrealized goals of the second wave of feminism up to that time ("NOW," 2009). This third wave of feminism made salient a more subjective voice that pointed at the intersection of race and gender with greater resolve than would have been possible when…… [Read More]

References

Coffey, L.T. (2011, October 11). Girl Project' reveals what teens are really thinking. Today People. Retrieved http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/44846267/ns/today-today_people/t/girl-project-reveals-what-teens-are-really-thinking/

Dow, B.J. (2003). Feminism, Miss America, and media mythology. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 6 (1), 127 -- 150.

Faludi, Susan, Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women (Three Rivers Press, 2006)

Feminist Majority Foundation, Choices Campus Leadership Program. (2011). Retrieved http://feministcampus.org/default.asp
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Theory and Practice

Words: 1112 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96528828



As the sessions proceeded, the therapist debriefed the client with the aim of de-escalating her psychologically. This enabled the client to explore and express a feeling of guilt and perception that she had failed to give her best to maintain her job. During the debriefing process, it was evident that the client believed that she was responsible for her job loss. She had been experiencing notable difficulties maintaining concentration and sleeping. Ultimately, this led to significant distress in social function.

After a week, the client reported to the therapist that she felt that she was not alone in the first time. As a result, she reported that she no longer needed the sedative medication, but remained compliant to the prescribed medication. After a while, the client related her belief in her ability to apply for new job opportunities. It is evident that the client's experience achieved the diagnostic criteria for…… [Read More]

References

Hillman, J.L. (2012). Crisis intervention and trauma counseling: New approaches to evidence-based practice. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.

Wainrib, B.R., & Bloch, E.L. (2008). Crisis intervention and trauma response: Theory and practice. New York: Springer.

Ziegler, S.M. (2010). Theory-directed nursing practice. New York: Springer Pub. Co.
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Feminist Scholars Have Made Important

Words: 940 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94071563

Interviewers possess a certain power because they have both taken and been given authority to ask questions (and to expect answers) that most people do not get to ask the subject. The subject can claim or reclaim power by refusing to answer questions, or by lying. The researcher can reclaim some of that power by the fact that getting to serve as an expert can be deeply rewarding to the subject, who will not want to relinquish the role of expert.

The interviewer tends to have the power of a prestigious institution such as a university behind her or him, which can shift power to the interviewer, especially in research projects in which there is already a power social or economic differential between researcher and subject. However, sometimes the power that the interviewer holds because of her or his association with an institution can be countered by the power of…… [Read More]

Denzin (2001) takes an even more radical assessment of the ways in which interviewer and subject interact (or can interact) with each other. Moving beyond looking at interviews as a collaborative process (albeit one in which the two sides may have different levels of power and commitment to the process) to looking at interviewing as a form of performance.

Such a dramaturgical analysis hearkens back to Erving Goffman, but Denzin extends this analysis by adding in elements of postmodern theory. He argues that both people involved in an interview have a far greater degree of control over how the other person sees them than they realize. Even more than this, each person involved in the interview has a far greater degree of control over the nature of their own reality than they tend to realize.

An ethnographic interview thus, according to Denzin, is a set of parallel performances in which each person is actively arranging their experiences to make their own world meaningful to themselves within the context of their social and cultural world even as they also try to mold the other person's behavior and assessment of self. Seen in this respect, each interview has clear agonistic features to it that, carefully and insightfully managed, can allow for deeply insightful and rigorous research.
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Theory -- Approach Linkage as You Prepare

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37892126

Theory -- Approach Linkage

As you prepare to complete your literature review, it is important to understand the relationship between theory and the qualitative approach. For this Discussion, you will analyze this relationship and how it is -- or is not -- reflected in the articles you have chosen.

To prepare for this Discussion:

eview the course text readings for this week and the media segment on theory.

Consider the role of theory in qualitative research.

eview the articles you have located for your literature review thus far. In each one, how clear is the alignment of theory with the choice of qualitative approach for the study? How well do the authors justify the alignment?

Which article stands out to you as the best example of alignment between theory and approach? Why?

Draw inferences from the qualitative articles in your literature review to answer the following question: "What is the…… [Read More]

References

Abas, M., Ostrovschi, N.V., Prince, M., Gorceag, V.I., Trigub, C., & Oram, S. (2013). Risk

factors for mental disorders in women survivors of
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Theory Comparison

Words: 562 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97000938

Hermeneutics

Phenomenology and Hermeneutics

Aside from positivism or quantitative research paradigm, two other paradigms are considered essential in the conduct of research or simply, knowing and understanding a particular event or phenomenon using a particular 'lens'or paradigm / perspective. These two (2) paradigms are qualitative in nature, namely the interpretive and critical paradigms. Critical paradigm is closely associated with the Marxist, feminist, and psychoanalytic schools of thought, while interpretive or symbolic interactionism paradigm is linked with hermeneutics and phenomenology. The focus of the discussions that follow will be on this second paradigm, interpretive paradigm, particularly exploring the hermeneutic and phenomenological schools of thought (Fossey, 2002, p. 719).

In order to understand these schools of thought, it is important to also understand the tradition from which these ideas emerged. Under the interpretive paradigm, truth is considered subjective and variable. In truth-seeking, the researcher recognizes that there are many "truths," and these…… [Read More]

References

Fossey, E., C. Harvey, F. McDermott, and L. Davidson. (2002). "Understanding and evaluating qualitative research." Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 36.

Laverty, S. (2003). "Hermeneutic phenomenology and phenomenology: a comparison of historical and methodological considerations." International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Vol. 2(3).
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Human Trafficking Feminist Issue

Words: 1591 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9856909

Theory -- Approach Linkage

Human trafficking in Vietnam: Article critique

Although no region of the world is immune to the problem of human trafficking, in certain areas the crime is particularly acute. In Asia, the ratio of trafficked persons relative to the rest of the population is even higher than it is worldwide, with 3 victims per every 1,000 inhabitants, and that is only of the persons who are known to be trafficked (uong 2012: 48). There are also a likely very high percentage of trafficked persons who are not detected by any legal agencies at all. "The exact number of victims of human trafficking, therefore, is likely to be much higher" (uong 2012: 49). The majority are likely thought to be women, specifically women in the sex trade. With this in mind, uong (2012) offers a gender-based analysis of trafficking, with a focus upon Vietnam. Vietnam is often called…… [Read More]

Despite these weaknesses, the evidence presented by Duong (2012) is unique and valuable simply because it takes a case study approach. Few articles which deal with trafficking do so; most discuss the phenomenon in a generalized fashion that does not take into consideration regional differentiation. As pervasive as the problem of trafficking may be, it is important not to present the issue without regards to national and regional cultural differences and to take into consideration how different populations are affected in its various manifestations.

Reference

Duong, K.A. (2012). Human trafficking in a globalized world: Gender aspects of the issue and anti-trafficking politics. Journal of Research in Gender Studies, 2(1), 48-65.
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Half the Sky From a Feminist Perspective

Words: 1781 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19788825

Half the Sky from a Feminist Perspective

In the last sixty years, women in estern countries and to a lesser extent the rest of the world have become outspoken about women's rights, demanding equal rights in political, economic, cultural, social, and domestic spheres. Their struggles and activism, generally known as feminist movements, helped to elevate the status of women in many countries. Yet, as Nicholas D. Kristoff and Sheryl udunn document in their book Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for omen orldwide, the struggle for gender equality is far from over. Kristoff and udunn demonstrate the deeply troubling picture of gender relations around the world where women and girls are systematically subjected to brutality, mistreatment, and discrimination. In their attempt to expose gender inequality in the world, Kristoff and udunn are largely successful, but their analysis is not well-grounded in feminist scholarship, which weakens their argumentation.

Kristoff and…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Einstein, Zillah. Global Obscenities: Patriarchy, Capitalism, and the Lure of Cyberfantasy. New York: New York University Press, 1998.

Harvey, David. A Brief History of Neoliberalism. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. Print.

Healing, Raven. "White Stockings and Black Widows: Women in Chechnya -- Myths and Realities." Off Our Backs 35.3/4 (2005): 44-47. Web. 22 Oct. 2011. JSTOR.

Kristoff, D. Nicholas, and Sheryl Wudunn. Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. New York: Knopf, 2009. Print.
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Intercultural and or Cross-Cultural Communication Theories

Words: 1848 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32191910

Support for the second hypothesis, that male speakers would be perceived as less cooperative than female speakers, also varied across situations, and the effect was even smaller" (Edwards & Hamilton 2004). Support for the Tannen model only was found after additional research was done, and a new questionnaire was given that scored recipient's self-perception in terms of feminine and masculine characteristics and inculcation into traditional gender roles. Individuals with strong gender self-images were more likely to fall in line with the Tannen model of women perceiving nurturance and males perceiving conflict in relatively neutral scenarios and seeing men in general as less cooperative.

This study is provocative on several levels, not the least of which in its stress upon the individualized nature of gender norms and the lack of inherent biological tendencies towards perceiving nurturance and conflict. It suggests the need to more carefully screen subjects in terms of individualized…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Edwards, Renee & Mark a Hamilton. "You Need to Understand My Gender Role: An Empirical

Test of Tannen's Model of Gender and Communication." Sex Roles. 50.7/8 (2004):

491-504. Research Library. ProQuest. 30 Oct. 2008  http://www.proquest.com/ 

Oetzel, John G. & Stella Ting-Toomey. "Face concerns in interpersonal conflict."
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Integrated Theory

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89798470

Integrated Theory

Sexual assault is an assault which is of a sexual nature done on another person either of the same of different sex. It also includes any form of sexual act that is committed without the consent of the person. Although in most cases, sexual assault is done by a man on a woman but in some cases, it has been documented to also be done by several men, women or children on men and children also Openshaw et al., 1993()

Prevalence

In the U.S. alone, about 300,000 cases of rape of women are reported every year. Additionally, 3.7 million women are usually subjected to other forms of unwilling sexual activity. There are also another 80,000 children in America who are abused sexually every year. Estimates by help agencies say that about one in every six American women has experienced sexual assault or will experience sexual assault at least…… [Read More]

Bibliography of Scholarly References, 1970-1992. Family Relations, 42(2), 222-226.
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HRM Organizational Behavior Theories Frameworks and the

Words: 4457 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44961156

HM Organizational Behavior, Theories, Frameworks and the Links Between Individual and Organizational Performance

This work in writing conducts a critical evaluation of HM Organizational Behavior Theories Frameworks that link performance.

Defining and measuring the effectiveness and performance of workers is a specific part of the HM manager's work. The question presenting is one that asks how the skills, behaviors and attitudes that are needed by workers to successfully and effectively perform their roles is defined. One way of measuring this is linking the performance of individuals to the organizational goals. This is generally accomplished through use of competencies which are described as "the integrated knowledge, skills, judgment, and attributes that people need to perform a job effectively. By having a defined set of competencies for each role in the business, it shows workers the kinds of behaviors the organizational values…" (MindTools, 2011) Lawrence (1998) reports that people are "multifaceted and…… [Read More]

References

Alderfer, C.P. (1972). Existence, relatedness, and growth. New York: Free Press.

Argyris, C. & Schon, DA (1996) Organizational Learning II Theory, Method, and Practice. Reading MA: Addison-Wesley.

Beer, M. (1980) Organization Change and Development: A Systems View. Santa Monica, CA, Goodyear.

Castellano, William G. (nd) A New Framework of Employee Engagement. Center for Human Resource Strategy Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.
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Sociological Theory Sociology There Were Several Theories

Words: 1215 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68955335

Sociological Theory

Sociology

There were several theories that I found interesting as a part of the course, yet the theory that I connected with most personally was Symbolic Interaction. This theory was established first by George Herbert Mead, who coined the phrase "symbolic interactionism" first. The theory has been present in the field of sociology for several decades, and after the death of Mead, other sociologists took on the theory in their own works, studies, and theories. This theory is one of my favorites for a few reasons, one of which is because I believe I have seen it at work in my own life and in the interactions of others in their lives.

I also agree with the validity of this theory because I feel that it coincides with other theories in other fields, such as psychology. There are psychologists, such as Freudian psychologists and Lacanian psychologists that have…… [Read More]

References:

Sage Publishing. (nd). Chapter 16: Symbolic Interactionist Theories of Identity. Web, Available from: http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/50436_ch_16.pdf. 2013 July 08.

Shott, S. (1979). Emotion and Social Life: A Symbolic Interactionist Analysis. The American Journal of Sociology, 84(6), 1317 -- 1334. 2013 July 08.

Smith, Ronald W. And Bugni, Valerie, "Symbolic interaction theory and architecture" (2006). Faculty Publications (S). Paper 5. Available from: http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/sociology_pubs/5. 2013 July 08.
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Bruner's Constructivist Theory and the Conceptual Paradigms

Words: 3441 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3905232

Bune's constuctivist theoy and the conceptual paadigms of Kolb's Expeiential Leaning theoy dawing on the associated theoies ae Kinesthetic and Embodied Leaning. As also noted in the intoductoy chapte, the guiding eseach question fo this study was, "What ae the caee paths fo teaching atists seeking to deploy into the field of community at and development?" To develop timely and infomed answes to this eseach question, this chapte povides a eview of the elevant pee-eviewed and scholaly liteatue concening these theoetical famewoks to investigate the diffeent caee paths teaching atists seek to deploy into the field of community at and development, including ceative community building and adult community centes such as woking with Alzheime's Disease and stoke victims.

Adult Leaning Theoies

Kolb's Expeiential Leaning Theoy. Thee ae a wide aay of theoetical models that can be used to identify and bette undestand teaching and leaning pefeences by educatos and students,…… [Read More]

references to improve coaching and athletic performance: Are your players or students kinesthetic learners? The Journal of Physical

Education, Recreation & Dance, 80(3), 30-34.

Fowler, J. (2013, March). Art rescue in a troubled world. Arts & Activities, 153(2), 36-39.

Kerka, S. (2002). Somatic/embodied learning and adult education: Trends and issues alert. ERIC

Kessler, R. (2000). The soul of education: Helping students find connection, compassion, and character at school. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum
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Educational Theory Meaning of Authentic

Words: 936 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92827016

Instead, it is rigid and reinforced with bureaucracy and red tape, thus making it a poor system for education and children.

Educating the whole child." Educating the whole child is an idea that took root in the early 20th century and is making a comeback in education. The educational model is conducted throughout the child's education - from kindergarten through high school, and recognizes the child is a complete being, with spirit, mind, and body, and each item must be addressed in the educational model. The model attempts to educate the "whole" child - heart, head, and hands, by offering education in a variety of areas, from academics to art and practical, hands-on activities. The children are encouraged to play as well as study, to help develop fully rounded personalities and ideas. Teachers also use storytelling, fairy tales, and other folk art as models for teaching and involving the children…… [Read More]

References

Editors. (2007.) Ism book. Retrieved from the Ismbook.com Web site: http://www.ismbook.com/intellectualism.html17 March 2007.

Gur-Ze'ev, I. (1999). Knowledge, violence, and education. Retrieved from the Encyclopedia of philosophy in education Web site: http://www.vusst.hr/ENCYCLOPAEDIA/main.htm17 March 2007.

Waghid, Y. (2005). Action as an educational virtue: Toward a different understanding of democratic citizenship education. Educational Theory 55 (3), 323-342. doi:10.1111/j.1741-5446.2005.00006.x http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1741-5446.2005.00006.x
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Feminine Criminology

Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18500397

Feminist Criminology and Victimization Theory

Feminist Criminology

Feminist criminology theory proposes that social and ethnic structures that lead to gender oppression will increase the prevalence of criminality among the oppressed (Bernard, 2013). In most cultures, including the west, there exists a history of subjugation of women at all levels of society. The feminist movement in the United States and elsewhere accordingly sought to reduce or eliminate the power of these social, legal, and religious sanctions that relegated women to second class citizenship. This was the driving force behind the emergence of the feminist criminology model.

In support of the feminist criminology model, Bernard (2013) points out that some women within society have a higher risk of incarceration. In the U.S., this high-risk demographic is non-white, young, living in poverty, under-educated, and unmarried with children. There also tends to be a multi-generational history of drug/alcohol problems and domestic violence. This demographic…… [Read More]

References

Bernard, April. (2013). The intersectional alternative: Explaining female criminality. Feminist Criminology, 8(1), 3-19.

McCollister, Kathryn E., French, Michael T., and Fang, Hai. (2010). The cost of crime to society: New crime-specific estimates for policy and program evaluation. Drug & Alcohol Dependence, 108(1-2), 98-109.

Simpson, Sally S., Yahner, Jennifer L., and Dugan, Laura. (2008). Understanding women's pathways to jail: Analysing the lives of incarcerated women. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 41(1), 84-108.

Wilcox, Pamela. (2010). Victimization, theories of. In Bonnie S. Fisher and Steven P. Lab (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Victimology and Crime Prevention. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
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Deductive Logic and Theory Building

Words: 1060 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58114009

Deductive and Inductive Theory Construction

There has been much controversy regarding feminism during recent decades and even though the contemporary society has reached a particularly advanced level when considering the idea of civilization, gender discrimination continues to occur in some areas. One's location is likely to be an important factor in making the respective individual more or less of a feminist. Geographic locations are thus essential in shaping a person's character and his or her determination to become a feminist. I believe that it is very likely for feminism to depend on factors such as geographic location, taking into account that many cultures are hesitant about accepting feminist ideas and some are even likely to use harsh criticism as a means to control or even to eradicate these respective ideas.

My theory is going to attempt to confirm the fact that geographic location can play an important role in making…… [Read More]

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Race Critical Theories Text and

Words: 1044 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19941767

Essed notes the profound perceived threat to power experienced by those in the majority feel when even small encroachments are made by other groups into the dominant fabric of society, and how tacit racism against minorities is often allowed even by those who might not consider themselves prejudiced on an interactional and personal level (184). In short, the institutional racism of society inevitably affects interpersonal relations, even amongst people who do not harbor what we might think of as hatred in their hearts. Racism for Essed is an ideological social construct, a powerful social and philosophical method of enforcement that affects how 'people' see the world, and also the mechanisms of the justice system (185). Racist images and practices become an invisible and accepted part of daily life, and are unquestioned, thus it is not enough to simply change one's individual mind (190). Her essay, though it seems overly focused…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Race Critical Theories: Text and Context. Philomena Essed & David Theo Goldberg, Ed.

Blackwell, 2002.
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Marxist or Neo-Marxist Research Theorist Theory Summary

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70523138

arxist or Neo-arxist Research

Theorist

Theory Summary

Critique of Theory

ax Weber

According to ax Weber the state is a special entity that possesses a monopoly on the legitimate use of violence. Weber believes politics is a required activity of government used in order to influence and control the relative distribution of force and power in the country.

Weber wrote of three main types of authority and political leadership domination that is present in society. These three types are charismatic, traditional and legal domination.

Weber also developed a theory of stratification where he explained and used such ideas as class, status, and party. According to his theory class is determined by an individual's economic situation. The notion of status is similar to prestige and honor. And the main purpose of parties is to gain domination in certain spheres of life. Like Weber, arx saw society as the struggle for class…… [Read More]

Mao Zedong

Marxism identifies only 2 types of production, Two types of production can be used, human and material. These two aspects have interrelation and they depend on each other. However, Mao tried to prove that such an interrelation is not essential. In his opinion both types of production should be included in the economic plan. He also took care and observed the process of population growth. Initially, China's post-1949 leaders were ideologically disposed to view a large population as an asset. Mao said an army of people is invincible. During Mao's rule, from 1949 to 1976, China's population increased from around 550 to over 900 million people. Mao believed that family planning should be integrated as a part of the overall plan for the development of the national economy, and that people should learn how to manage material production and how to manage themselves.

Although
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Ethical Theories in Nursing

Words: 4777 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74406948

Nursing Ethical Theories

Ethical Theories in Nursing

Significance of Moral in Nursing

Deontology vs. Utilitarianism

Deontology

Utilitarianism

Justice Ethics vs. Care Ethics

Justice Ethics

Care Ethics

ights Ethics

Conflict of ights

Ethical Theories in Nursing

Moral philosophy has moved from addressing Plato's question of what makes the good person, to Kant's query as to the right thing to do, to Buber's concern with relationship. Whether referring to business ethics' interest in relationships between corporations and consumers; legal ethics' focus on relationships among the legal system, clients, and society; or nursing ethics' consideration of the relationship between patient and nurse; ethics and morality are conceptualized and actualized on the playing field of relationship.

The nature of nursing as a moral endeavor is an assumption embedded in any philosophical or theoretical consideration of the discipline and practice of nursing. An the goal of nursing is a moral one, namely, the good of…… [Read More]

References

Bandman, E.L., & Bandman, B.(1995). Nursing ethics through the lifespan (3rd ed.). Stamford, CT: Appleton & Lange

Buber, M.(1965). Between man and man (R.G. Smith & M.Friedman, Trans). New York: Macmillan. (Original work published 1947).

Carper, B. (1979). The ethics of caring. Advances in Nursing Science, 1(3), 11-19

Cooper, M.C. (1991). Principle-oriented ethics and the ethic of care: A creative tension. Advances in Nursing Science, 14(2), 22-31.
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Erikson's Theory of Psychological Development

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94000969

The theory does not appear to allow for success in the workplace solely for the sake of workplace success. Instead, it appears to view procreation as the ultimate purpose of human life, with workplace success only a vehicle towards attaining success within the loving family circle.

To these ideas the authors add that the theory does not account for intimacy beyond the heterosexual and indeed beyond the sexual. As such, the theory is fundamentally inadequate to address the entire paradigm of successful adult individuation and attachment. Furthermore, the authors note that the theory is very limited in its connection between the biological and the psychological paradigms of differences between the male and female. While the theory does indeed better address the positive aspects of female development, it does so primarily in terms of the female drive to bear children, which substantiates the feminist view that the theory appears to be…… [Read More]

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Cognitive Theory Cognition Is the

Words: 1824 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29875252

It thus becomes the concern of CT researchers and clinicians to address and investigate sex differences as an aspect in depression and to confront how they understand and treat women, who comprise 2/3 of clients. A feminist framework may be adopted for a more comprehensive and sensitive approach to the problem in order to benefit the large group of women clients. The new understanding must also be incorporated into the mainstream of cognitive writings and practice and treated as only a special interest topic (Hurst).

Cognitive behavior therapy, based on the five foregoing studies, has shown important gains greater than traditional counseling approach, but needs follow-up work. It has also demonstrated efficacy in producing lower relapse rate than the standard clinical treatment. The discourse approach to the negative self-perception of depressed patients has showed limitations as a technique. ut it can be useful in reducing symptoms among injection drug users.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Brown, KM. (1999). Social Cognitive Theory. University of South Florida. http://www.med.usf.edu/~kmbrown/Social_Cognitive_Theory_Overview.htm

2. Dobson, K.S. And Drew, M.L. (1999). Negative Self-Concept in Clinical Diagnosis. Canadian Psychology. Canadian Psychological Association.

3. Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology. (2001). Depression. Encyclopedia of Psychology. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_q2699/is_0004/ai_2699000439

4. Hawkins, W.E. (2005). Depression Therapy with Injection Drug Users. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse.
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Cross Cultural Theories Based on Bend it

Words: 2251 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69764147

Cross Cultural Theories Based on Bend it Like

BECKHAM

COSS CULTUAL THEOIES BASED ON BEND IT LIKE BECKHAM

Cross cultural theories based on bend it like Beckham

Movies are one way in which different issues such as social and cultural backgrounds of different societies are filmed to educate or enlighten the community at large on different life styles as well as cultural diversity. Different films do have different numbers of characters, who act as family members, friends, and business personnel's in order to portray to the different issues to their viewers. With the help of a team comprising of the writer, producer and the directors, the characters are able to follow instructions so as to produce a film with the required themes. Bend it like Beckham, is a comedy-drama film in which the title is derived from a famous England football player David Beckham and his ability to score from…… [Read More]

Reference list

Bates, D.G., & Plog, F. (1976). Cultural Anthropology, 3rd Ed., New York: McGraw-Hil

Baruth, L.G., & Manning, M.L. (2003). Multicultural counseling and psychotherapy: A lifespan perspective (3rd Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Cavalli-Sforza, L.L., and M.W. Feldman (1981), Cultural Transmission and Evolution.

Princeton: Princeton University Press
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Sociology Theories How Do Berger

Words: 1369 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98964612



QUESTION THREE: "Is inequality of social classes inevitable?" The conflict theory put forward by Ralf Dahrendorf begins with a discussion of Marxism and the fact that in industry, the conflict between classes - the capitalist and proletariat (worker) - the worker had a natural inclination to be in conflict with the capitalists who were the authority, the bosses. The same kind of conflict carried over into the political realm as well, sometimes violent. The problem was that there was no system whereby conflicts could be resolved. But Marx's analysis, Dahrendorf goes on, was tainted because of his obsession with proletarian revolution.

At this point in his essay, Dahrendorf, though rejecting Marx in that context, asserts that since there are "interest groups" and "quasi-groups" those must then be considered "classes." And if there are classes, it is then logical to assume there will be groups, and quasi-groups that will always have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berger, Peter; & Luckmann, Thomas. (1966). The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise

In the Sociology of Knowledge. Garden City NY: Anchor Books, pp. 51-55, 59-61.

Collins, Particia Hill. (1990). Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment. Boston: UnwinHyman, pp. 221-238.

Dahrendorf, Ralf. (1959). Class and Class Conflict in Industrial Society. Stanford: Stanford
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Rationalist Theories of International Relations Despite the

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Rationalist Theories of International Relations

Despite the name, rationalist theories of international relations are anything but, limited as they are by both an almost childlike understanding of human behavior and a catastrophic lack of imagination. Rationalist theories of international relations, like the Objectivism which developed in the same post-orld ar II period, rely on a number of assumptions which have since been shown to be empirically false. Rationalism assumes that the most important, and in fact, the only entities dictating international relations are nation states, and that these nation states are engaged in a zero-sum game of diplomacy and war, in which the goals of every nation state is eventual dominance above all others, so that international relations are dictated almost exclusively through violence or coercion, with diplomacy essentially reduced to the well-spoken threat of force. Thus, rationalist theories of international relations are not only incorrect, but altogether dangerous, as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Art, Robert, and Kenneth Waltz. The use of force: military power and international politics.

Lanham: Rowan and Littlefield Publishers, 2009.

Baylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens. The globalization of world politics: an introduction to international relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.

Blatter, Joachim. "Performing Symbolic Politics and International Environmental Regulation:
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Deductive and Inductive Theory Construction

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Deductive Logic and Theory Building

Theory

Poverty is often a significant element influencing individuals to take on a life of crime, taking into account that organized crime leaders tend to recruit their subordinates from underprivileged environments. Poor persons have lesser options in comparison to others and gradually come to consider that committing criminal acts is the only solution they have in order to survive. From the perspective of organized crime leaders poor areas are thus perfect recruitment spots. There is a complex relationship between poverty and organized crime and by analyzing a series of organized crime communities from around the world one is likely to observe that many tend to focus on recruiting underprivileged individuals.

hat the theory will address

hen considering the idea of organized crime, one needs to gain a better understanding of why people resort to joining such groups in order to understand their dynamics. Many organized…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Bruneau, T., Dammert, L., and Skinner, E. (2011). Maras: Gang Violence and Security in Central America. University of Texas Press.

Kelly, R.J., Chin, K., & Schatzberg, R. (1994). Handbook of Organized Crime in the United States. Greenwood Publishing Group.

Ramsey, G. Poverty a Recruitment Tool for Mexico's Criminal Gangs. Retrieved September 8, 2013, from  http://www.insightcrime.org/news-analysis/poverty-a-recruitment-tool-for-mexicos-criminal-gangs 

Rosenthal, T. "LOS ZETAS AND HEZBOLLAH, A DEADLY ALLIANCE OF TERROR AND VICE," Retrieved September 8, 2013, from  http://www.theamericasreport.com/2013/07/08/los-zetas-and-hezbollah-a-deadly-alliance-of-terror-and-vice/
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Ethical Theory Ethics Given What

Words: 1039 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56274907

Utilitarianism is most often used by healthcare organizations like insurance companies: to keep costs down for the many, a potentially valuable treatment may be denied to the individual because it is deemed experimental or unnecessarily costly. As unpalatable as the idea may be, no patient can be tested for every single conceivable illness he or she might contract. There must be some prioritization of high-risk groups. During his or her duties, a nurse may often ration her time, prioritizing where it will do the greatest good for the greatest number of people, based upon the severity of their need. However, in other instances a nurse may need to deploy the categorical imperative and state that something is clearly wrong or right, regardless of a financial calculus. A nurse must care for all patients to the best of his or her ability and preserve patient autonomy and privacy unless the patient…… [Read More]

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Educational Theory That Ideas and

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e speak of the "Principles of Professional Conduct" (PPC) that most educational institutions present to employees (and sometimes students) regardless of their station in life or their position within the educational community. In the case of Ball State University in Ohio, the opening paragraph of its "Principles for Professional Conduct for Career Services & Employment Professionals" points out why the career services and employment professionals are obliged to follow the PPC.

The point made by Ball State's PPC is that employees are in a "partnership effort" with the "common goal of achieving the best match between the individual student" and the institution. Others involved include all faculty, staff, community members, students and prospective students as well. The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) actually developed the PPC for universities and colleges, with an eye towards helping students with career planning, placement, and recruitment." The NACE puts forward the following…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ball State University. (2008). Principles for Professional conduct for Career Service & Employment Professionals. Retrieved Feb. 22, 2008, at http://www.naceweb.org/principles/principl.html.(Fuss, Diana. 2006). Essentialism. Emory University. Retrieved Feb. 22, 2008, at http://www.english.emory.edu/Bahri/Essentialism.html.

Holma, Katariina. (2007). Essentialism Regarding Human Nature in the Defense of Gender

Equality. Journal of Philosophy of Education, 41(1), 44-55.

Merriman-Webster. (2008). Essentialism. Retrieved Feb. 23, 2008, at  http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/essentialism .
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Marxism and Feminism Marxism Is a Theory

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Marxism and Feminism

Marxism is a theory of economic system while feminism is exclusively connected with relationship between men and women so how do these two could possibly unite. An interesting question- the answer to which lies in understanding the basic structure of Marxism on which feminism is loosely based. Alternatively, we can first understand what feminism is all about and see how it gets its inspiration from Marxism. Feminism is the result of women liberation movement, which began somewhere in the 18th century and gained momentum in late 19th century. During this time women realized that they were not being treated the same way as men and everything was viewed through masculine binoculars. In other worlds, it was found that males were completely dominating every area including 'thinking' and this resulted in women liberation movement, which ultimately led to feminism. Feminism today exists in various forms and is characterized…… [Read More]

References

1. Cliff, Tony 1984. Class Struggle and Women's Liberation. London: Blackwell.

2. Dunayevskaya, R. Women's liberation and the dialectics of revolution: Reaching for the future. Detroit: Wayne State University Press. 1996

3. Hartmann, Heidi. 1981. "The Unhappy Marriage of Marxism and Feminism: Toward a More Progressive Union." In Lydia Sargent, ed. op. cit., 1981:1-42.

4. Terrell Carver, Department of Politics, University of Bristol, Marxism and Feminism: Living with your 'Ex', PSA Annual Conference 6-8 April 2004