Modern World Essays (Examples)

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WWII History Making Decades WWII-Present

Words: 2515 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66978809

Diversity -- with the exception of homophobia -- was beginning to be commonly accepted and praised. Technology -- such as the use of DNA in criminology and the introduction of the PC -- was becoming more prominent in the lives of everyday Americans. In the Cold War, President Gorbachev asked for openness and economic freedom, while President eagan asked him to tear down the Berlin Wall, which he did. However, the discovery of AIDS had a far more profound impact on the American people than any of these events. In 1981, the first case of AIDS was reported in the United Kingdom, and this eventually caused quite a crisis in the U.S., as it was first noticed among gay men, and then in women and children as well. People became scared because they were not sure what was causing the disease. esearch continued throughout the 1980s, but the fear caused…… [Read More]

References

Dove, R. (1999). Heroes & Icons: Rosa Parks. Retrieved August 12, 2009, from Time:

http://www.time.com/time/time100/heroes/profile/parks01.html

"Fascinating facts about the invention of the Internet by Vinton Cerf in 1973." (2007,

May 30). Retrieved August 12, 2009, from the Great Idea Finder:  http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/internet.htm
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World Is Flat A Brief

Words: 2218 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16365082

Friedman considers insourcing to be flattener number eight, because it allows small companies to compete like major supply-chain companies. Insourcing refers to hiring another company to handle a company's supply chain. UPS is the major supplier for insourcing services in the United States. Friedman believes that insourcing flattens in three ways: by letting little companies compete in the global market; by dissolving barriers between companies; and by standardizing business practices across companies.

Finally, Friedman looks at a group of flatteners that he refers to as the steroids. These are small flatteners that have the effect of amplifying the other flatteners. Mobile steroids are those technologies allowing people to work in non-traditional environments and include cellular phones, laptops, and wireless internet access. Personal steroids are those things that give power to the individual, and include personal computers, search engines, and peer-to-peer file sharing. While these flatteners are not powerful enough to…… [Read More]

References

Friedman, T. (2007). The world is flat: a brief history of the twenty-first century. New York:

Picador.
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Modern Middle East History

Words: 1600 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57126716

Zionism

"Diaspora" is a Greek term meaning "to disperse," or "to scatter," and is often applied to the Jews and their dispersion out of the land of Israel. Many scholars point to the year 588 B.C., when the kingdom of Judea was conquered by the Babylonians as the beginning of the Jewish Diaspora. ("Diaspora") The Jews were forced to relocate to Babylon where, even after the Persians conquered the Babylonians and allowed the Jews to return to Judea, many remained. It was also when the Babylonians conquered Judea that many Jews fled to Egypt, where they created a Jewish community in exile that continued for centuries. After the return of the Jews to Judea in 538 B.C., the entire area became embroiled in a series of conflicts that resulted in the creation of a Hellenic culture throughout the middle east. As a result, Jews spread out from their traditional homeland…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Balfour Declaration." Avalon Project. Web. 8 Dec. 2012.

 http://avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/balfour.asp 

"Diaspora." Jewish Encyclopedia. Web. 8 Dec. 2012.

 http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5169-diaspora
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world history

Words: 1406 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35178739

Jerry H. Bentley, the word "world history" has different meanings for different societies. While some may define it as a broad analysis of the whole world's history, others believe it implies foreign history. But, this word doesn't actually correspond to either definition. It denotes historical learning which undertakes an overt comparison of experiences beyond individual societal boundaries or studies interactions among individuals hailing from diverse communities or studies broad historical processes and trends which extend beyond discrete communities. Besides highlighting cross-cultural dealings in a historical context, one chief concern of the major part of modern world history deals with constructing alternative approaches to the established Eurocentric perspectives of history.[footnoteRef:1] [1:. Jerry H. Bentley, A Companion to Western Historical Thought, ed. Lloyd Kramer and Sarah Maza (Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishers, 2002), 393.]

Ever since historical events began to be documented, the element of world history was apparent. The ancient world lacked access…… [Read More]

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WWI When World War I

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12021802

..the spirit of ruthless brutality will enter itn every fiber of our national life" (Johnson 643).

Staying out, states Tindall & Shi 948), was "more easily said than done, not least for Wilson himself. Americans might want to stay out of the war, but most of them cared which side won. Ironically, because there were so many first- or second-generation immigrants from Germany and Ireland, the leaning was toward the Central Powers. However, "old-line Americans" mostly of ritish descent were sympathetic to the Allies.

Yet actions were to occur that made the final decision. In 1915, the Germans sank the ritish Cunard liner Lusitania with 128 Americans on board. The Americans were outraged and sent letters to no avail. Then U-boats sank a number of American ships and finally, the press published a secret telegram from the German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmerman to the Mexican government proposing a German-Mexican offensive…… [Read More]

Books Cited

Johnson, Paul. History of the American People. New York: Harper Collins, 1997.

Tindall, George Brown and Shi, David. America. A Narrative History. New York:

Norton, 1984.

Zinn, Hoard. People's History of the United States. New York: Harper Collins, 1999.
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Modern Technology

Words: 1263 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79134075

Interface Culture

The question of what constitutes 'interface culture' is constantly debated in the field of interactive design. Modern technology allows us to communicate more frequently with one another but it is uncertain if we are actually growing closer to our friends and associates; we may be growing farther apart and more isolated in our virtual worlds. There are both positive and negative sides to modern technology; at minimum we need to have a dialogue about interactive technology's effect on social interactions and culture.

As designers, we must be more aware of the needs of others and the human social and political environment. Art has often been viewed as the primary teaching tool to reveal insights about the human condition but technological design can have the same potential. It is true that design is more interactive than personal like art. But technological design in all its forms encompasses outreach through…… [Read More]

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WWI the Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

Words: 1553 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55010445

WWI

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife represented a culmination of several concurrent forces, all of which led to the outbreak of World War. The concurrent forces that led to World War One can be loosely grouped under the following categories: nationalism, imperialism, and militarism. Within each of these categories are ample sub-categories that can testify to the extent of forces that shaped the pre-war conditions throughout not just Europe but the entire world. World War One was a total war for many reasons: it involved serious civilian casualties on a horrific scale for all parties. The Great War also brought to light the impact of globalization on the global economy and political enterprise. Nationalism, imperialism, and militarism all played a part in shaping participation in World War One; the effects of which continue to reverberate.

As Marshall (2001) points out, "Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy were all…… [Read More]

References

Allan, T. (2003). The Causes of World War I. Chicago: Reed Elsevier.

Bosco, P., & Bosco, A. (2003). World War I. Infobase.

Heyman, N.M. (1997). World War I. Greenwood.

Marshall, S.L.A. (2001). World War I. New York: First Mariner.
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Modern Art of the 21st

Words: 1560 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29479497

(athus) (Day) ("Susan Elliot")

Conclusion

Clearly, the five different works are illustrating how the art of the 21st century is taking the techniques of the past and they are incorporating them with contemporary beliefs. The way that this is occurring is through using classical themes and approaches to set the mood of each piece of art. Then, it is building upon them by taking modern day issues and highlighting the importance of them.

Once this takes place, is the point that these beliefs will become a part of the message that the artist is sending to the viewer. This is when they will have a greater understanding of these ideas and will be motivated to take action. As a result, 21st century art is illustrating how these images are influencing everyone.

eferences

"Cathe Hendrick." Cathe Hendrick, 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012

"David Hatton." David Hatton, 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012…… [Read More]

References

"Cathe Hendrick." Cathe Hendrick, 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012

"David Hatton." David Hatton, 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012

"Igal Fedida." Igal Fedida, 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012 < http://igalfedida.com/index.php>

"Marianne Monnoye -- Termeer." Marianne Monnoye -- Termeer, 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012
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Modern Art

Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89146332

Modern Art

A primary concern of fauvism is the presence of strong colors. Fauvist works have relatively wild brushstrokes. The subject matter of fauvist painters is simple and often abstract. Fauvism is heavily influence by postimpressionism and pointillism. In "Woman with a Green Stripe," the viewer can distinguish between each color because of the brushstrokes. The portrait is simply of a woman, making a neutral face. The colors are stark and the painting is not realistic though we can still make out the subject. The water beneath the bridge is several colors in "London Bridge." There is not much distinction between the buildings of the background. This is not an exact replica of the London Bridge, yet again, we recognize it clearly. The painting is almost just a semblance of simple shapes and not an urban landscape.

ouault and Nolde both paint works of Jesus. In ouault's work, Jesus is…… [Read More]

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World War II in Europe

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23478242



By attacking from the North, Hitler effectively bypassed France's only real defense against invasion. Within two weeks, Paris was under Nazi control, and still seething from the harsh terms of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I, Hitler demanded that the surrender terms be signed in the very same spot as the armistice that ended that war, and in the very same railroad car, which he had brought out from its museum display for that purpose3. Belgium had surrendered to Germany without firing a shot, effectively dooming France to Nazi occupation, and nearly sealing the fate of more than a quarter million British troops sent to support Britain's ally, France. Only a last-

3. Hayes & Faissler p.444 minute scramble saved the British from capture, at the port city of Dunkirk, where the British used thousands of ships, boats, and dinghies to rescue them all and ferry…… [Read More]

References

Commager, H.S., Miller, D.L. The Story of World War II: Revised, Expanded & Updated from the Original Text by Henry Steele Commager (2002)

Hayes, C., Faissler, M. Modern Times: The French Revolution to the Present (1966)

Kowalick, T.M. The Western Tradition Transcripts (1989)

Lukacs, J. The Last European War (1976)
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Modern Language Associations of America Commonly Related

Words: 963 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69016899

Modern Language Associations of America, commonly related as the Modern Language Association is dauntlessly regarded as the sole functional professional association in the United States of America that is serving the purpose of facilitating the academic scholars of the languages and literature. Development of language and linguistics has been the most important tool for the empowerment of academic and scholarly research. Therefore the modern Language Associations of America serves as an organization that strengthens the study and disbursement along with the teaching of modern literature and languages.

The Modern Language Association was first conceived in 1985 and by now the organization includes about thirty thousand members in more than hundred countries., these basically includes the academic scholars, the graduating students, the researchers and the language professors. If we consider this ratio of scholars and academic professional being member of Modern Language Association than it can easily be figured out that…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Sharman, Gundula M. "Literature in the Modern Language Syllabus." Academic Exchange Quarterly 6.4 (2002): 98+.

Sparks, Richard L., James Javorsky, and Leonore Ganschow. "Should the Modern Language Aptitude Test Be Used to Determine Course Substitutions for and Waivers of the Foreign Language Requirement?" Foreign Language Annals 38.2 (2005): 201+.

Wilkerson, Carol. "Instructors' Use of English in the Modern Language Classroom." Foreign Language Annals 41.2 (2008): 310+.
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Worlds of Phaedo and the

Words: 4337 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48423269

It is only through occult understanding that the forms and the archetypal images and symbols can be interpreted.

Here we see that the term unconsciousness is very similar to the Platonic ideals and forms. Another aspect that will form part of the theoretical perspective of this study is the concept of transformation. In order to understand the occult and its relationship to the forms, a process of transformation has to take place. In Platonic terms this transformation is a radical change in life, morality and ethics; while for Jung it is transformation in terms of the deeper understanding of the relation of the unconscious to the conscious mind.

Transformation also has related occult meaning and symbols such as fire. Fire is an age-old indication of change of perception and consciousness. This also refers to Jungian concepts such as the shadow. There are many other points of reference and similarity between…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Archetypes as Defined by Carl Jung) October 9, 2004. http://www.acs.appstate.edu/~davisct/nt/jung.html#shadow

Arnzen. M. "The Return of the Uncanny." 1977. University of Oregon. March 17, 2004. http://paradoxa.com/excerpts/3-3intro.htm

Boeree, G. Carl Jung. October 11, 2004. http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/jung.html

Christian Churches of God) Mysticism Chapter 1 Spreading the Babylonian Mysteries (No. B7_1). October 9, 2004. http://www.holocaustrevealed.org/english/s/B7_1.html
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World Trade Discuss International Trade Issues and

Words: 921 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6048240

World Trade

Discuss international trade issues and how they impact starting a business in Denmark and how it pursues doing business with other countries

Denmark has been following bilateral trade policy based on free trade. This has helped it penetrate major markets while keeping the balance between import and exports. Denmark has been successful in the policy and has a lot of products exported to the U.S. And these include pharmaceutical products, nuclear reactors, boilers, machinery and mechanical appliances; electrical machinery and equipment, and Denmark also imports from the U.S. The World Bank economic indicators for Denmark for the year 2010 show that the current purchasing power per capita -- PPP is at $40,290. (Panjiva, 2012)

Denmark has expanded its trade relations recently with Canada. They both have identical business strategies. Both are based on the agri-food export sectors. The knowledge industries and the agricultural sector and modern concepts like…… [Read More]

References

Canada International. (2012) "Canada & Denmark trade" Retrieved 24 October 2012 from http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/denmark-danemark/bilateral_relations_bilaterales/canada_denmark-danemark.aspx?lang=eng&view=d

Ebay.com. (2012a) "International trading policy" Retrieved 24 October 2012 from  http://pages.ebay.com/help/policies/international-trading.html 

Ebay.com. (2012b) "Welcome to the new ebay" Retrieved 24 October 2012 from  http://announcements.ebay.com/2012/10/welcome-to-the-new-ebay/ 

EconomyWatch. (2010) "Denmark Export, Import and Trade"
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Modern Art Old Wine in

Words: 1111 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25833555

Rather than seeking to emulate an ideal, they sought instead to cobble together influences, styles, and techniques from a range of different traditions. Relying on what others have created without actually valuing those creations on their own merits is not respectful of either tradition or innovation.

The result was a hodge-podge of aesthetics that is not without merit, but that is criticized now (and for quite a time) for not having a clear focus. annerist artists neither venerated the past nor sought to create an entirely new way of seeing. They often did incorporate fantastical subjects and twisted the forms of both of these creatures and of human subjects into sinewy shapes. The effect was not so much dreamlike (or even nightmarish) but distorted.

Even as annerist artists borrowed freely from other traditions and so seemed to devalue the worth of innovation and the allure of the new, they did…… [Read More]

Modern art in general has had a much more positive regard for the innovative and new. The reasons for this are complicated but may reflect consequences that have arose since the Industrial Revolution. Industrialization brought about two important trends that affected the ways in which artists interact with and feel about the new. Industrialization made constant innovation a social good in a way that had never been true before. The fact that new technologies made it easier and easier to create novel objects in the commercial world bled over to a push toward the innovative in art.

The early phases of Modernist art played directly with the ideas of how technology and art intersected with each other and how the new era of the machine made it more difficult to create work that was based on the past. The machine changed everything and made it imperative for artists to re-evaluate what it meant to be an artist at all. Daumier's 1862 Nadar Elevating Photography to the Height of Art is an ironic visual exploration of the ways in which having artistic tools such as the camera made it impossible to make art as it once was. Timothy O' Sullivan's A Harvest of Death (1863) proved incontrovertibly that new technologies changed the way in which everyone (not just artists) would view the world.

The next phase of Modernist art continued the valorization of the new, although in far more ironic ways. Indeed, irony itself in many ways can be seen to be the way in which many artists chose to confront the emphasis on the new. Beginning with the (then) new century, artists tried to combine new technologies and new social mores to ensure their audiences that they were the newest and therefore the best thing. Giacomo Balla's Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash (1912) focused on the ways in which technology affects the literal ways in which people view the world while a work like Marcel Duchamp's Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) incorporating much more traditional artistic techniques with the innovative idea that art could only be defined by the artist.
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World War I Known at

Words: 3255 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87605902



Conscription

From the beginning of the war, there had been some variation in the Canadian attitude toward the conflict. Canada never questioned the legitimacy of the war and did not question the need for Canadian participation. There were differences of opinion, though, concerning how extensive the Canadian contribution should be. These variations affected the response to calls for enlistment and divided the country as the towns were more willing than the countryside, the prairies more willing than the Atlantic seaboard, and "it was observed that the proportion of enlistments achieved by any social group appeared to vary almost inversely to the length of its connection with Canada. On the one hand, the ritish-born -- the new arrivals with a large proportion of unattached males of military age -- gave the highest percentage of their numbers to the armed services, and, on the other hand, the French Canadians unquestionably gave the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ameringer, Charles D. Political Parties of the Americas, 1980s to 1990s: Canada, Latin America, and the West Indie.

Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1992.

Bothwell, Robert. History of Canada since 1867. Washington, D.C.: Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, 1996.

Boudreau, Joseph a. "Canada and the First World War: Essays in Honour of Robert "Canada and Worlod War I," the History of Canada (2007),  http://www.linksnorth.com/canada-history/canadaandworldwar1.html .
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World War II Book Review

Words: 1603 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34700032

It is key to understanding the author's view of love and even her own status as a woman and as a thinker. Of course, the book can simply be read as a love story of infidelity and sexual liberty gone wrong in the face of an ever-changing political society in a state of national and European chaos. But the Mandarins de Beauvoir referred to were also the elite, the intellectual elites of Chinese society who held themselves above from the common peasants.

Thus, by calling her fellow Left Bank intellectuals 'Mandarins' De Beauvoir symbolically calls upon her fellow intellectuals to become part and parcel of the political fray, rather than wasting their energies with entangling personal alliances that can be just as dissipating as the betrayals of Vichy and the subsequent alliances that sapped the French nation of its own vital energies. She calls upon the intellectual Mandarins of French…… [Read More]

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Protestant Ref Imperialism and WWI

Words: 1290 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34222582

92). Pope Innocent X lamented the procedure, of course -- for it served to subvert the truths which the oman Church strove to propagate.

Thus, the modern world was built not upon the majesty of kings and religion, but upon treaties and revolutionary ideals. The philosophical fruit of Protestantism would spring up in the age of omantic/Enlightenment doctrine, which would produce the American and French evolutions. "Liberty, equality, fraternity" would be the modern world's ethos -- in theory. However, capitalist ethics would undermine the romantic ideology. Imperialism -- for gold, God, and glory at the end of the medieval world -- would be based, in the modern world, upon sheer greed (as a principle). America defined this principle well with the notion of "manifest destiny," which by the end of the 19th century was expanded beyond the American frontier to encompass the whole globe.

The new Imperialism of America (and…… [Read More]

Reference List

Elliot, J.H. (2009). Spain, Europe and the Wider World: 1500-1800. Yale Universtiy

Press.

Haaren, J. (1904). Famous Men of the Middle Ages. New York, NY: American Book

Company.
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Dadaism in Modern Society

Words: 2736 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95276983

Dadaism in the Modern orld

The Danger of Definitions: Dadaism and its Modern Manifestations

Though there have been countless movements and representations of rejections of convention in the history of modern art in many cases these standards were developed by individuals acting in accordance with the idea that "this is how I see the world: love it or leave it" and hopefully love it as leave it doesn't pay the bills. Yet, with Dadaism, though there is a core few conceptual founders the movement is demonstrative of a collective of artists seeking to challenge convention. This work will briefly define Dadaism, as much as this is possible, provide a few representative examples and lastly and most importantly provide a unique analysis of how Dadaism can be seen reflected in art and life in the present time.

The Dadaists wished to let people know that regardless of the fact that the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Bjork & Gaga" Web. Dec. 12, 2011,  http://www.last.fm/group/Bj%C3%B6rk+and+Gaga 

"Burning Man; Desert Celebration of Self-Expression Grows Each Year." The Washington Times 22 Aug. 2003: A02.

Duchamp, Marcel. "Apropos of 'Readymades.'" Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art: A Sourcebook of artists' Writings. Eds. Kristine Stiles, Peter Selz. Berkeley: University of California, 1996. 819-20.

Duchamp, Marcel. "The Creative Act.'" Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art: A Sourcebook of artists' Writings. Eds. Kristine Stiles, Peter Selz. Berkeley: University of California, 1996. 818-19
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History of the World in

Words: 1287 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9274352

111), a product that gathered both good and evil forces on its way, a drink that could not have become global without the use of the slaves on a mass scale.

long their existence, the spirited drinks were designated as medicine, recreational drinks for pastime, means of social control, and due to the high degree of addiction that set in as soon as they moderation went out of the way, a source of distress for those who became addictive and their families. Rum, the first to replace the ratios of beer of the British ships and the main ingredient in the first cocktail, became the favorite drink of the English settlers who came to Virginia hoping to find a new source of wealth for them and their country. The second cocktail based on rum came on the tables of the Englishmen in the New World, under the form of punch.…… [Read More]

After centuries of using the spirits as a trade currency and means of alleviating during hard time, at the beginning of the twentieth century, the United States came to a stage when a movement that started by the middle of the nineteenth century will spread and end in the Prohibition era, with the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Health and religious reasons had led more and more people to believe that the only answer to the loss of moderation was to ban the production and consumption of alcoholic beverages altogether. Today, the period of fourteen years when the Eighteen Amendment was in use, is regarded as e period of experimentation that proved once again that any interdiction attracts the rise of illegal activities meant to work around it.

Standage, Tom. A History of the World in Six Glasses. 2005. Walker Publishing Company. New York

Drink: The History of Alcohol 1690-1920. The National Archives. Retrieved: Oct. 20, 2009. Available at: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/events/calendar/drink.htm
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China's Modern Society During the

Words: 1659 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95759978

("Chinese History.")

The Second Opium War would involve: the contention that the Chinese and the ritish would have for each other. As the ritish wanted greater controls of the ports and land routes. Yet, the Chinese felt that the treaty to end the First Opium War was excessive. This resulted, in open hostilities, as the ritish merchants were seeking exclusive rights to: Chinese markets, the free flow of merchants / missionaries throughout the country and the distinction of most favored nation trading status. This would lead to years of conflict that would last from 1856 to 1860. At which point, the Chinese would grant the ritish: increased access to seven more ports, monopolistic control of key markets and they agreed to pay them large sums of gold (as reparations for the war). This is important, because the second defeat would add to the overall levels of humiliation, leading to the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"A Rebellion that Nearly Worked." Life. 23 Sep. 1966: 76 -82. Print.

Chinese History. China Knowledge, 2000. Web. 14 Dec. 2010

Dukier, William. The Essential World History. Belmont: Thomason, 2008.

MLA Format. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/02/
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International Law in the Modern

Words: 1388 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80001707



This is an important issue and a number of commentators and critics have decried this loss of respect for international law. One commentator refers to the words of the politician and sociologist, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, who said that, "...there is nothing quite to compare with the falling from the American mind of the idea of the law of nations" (Kinsley). He also stated that,

At the beginning of Gulf ar II, we forgot... international law. e forgot international law once again. hen the U.N. Security Council would not play ball, we declared that our own invasion of Iraq was justified as a sovereign act of long-term self-defense against potential weapons of mass destruction, by the human rights situation within Iraq,

Kinsley).

Therefore, this is a cardinal area of international law that is in danger in the present age.

On the other hand, there are areas of international law that have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Horton, Scott. A Decent Respect: What does international law mean to us today

January 20, 2008. http://www.harpers.org/archive/2007/04/horton-20070428vgjt

Kinsley M. Today We Obey. Invoking international law -- when it suits us.2003.

January 20, 2008 http://www.slate.com/id/2080777/
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Globalized World in the Modern

Words: 3488 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6249351

This is the risk countries take by entering the world economy.

China is an emerging economic power in the world. This has come about due to the enormous market there -- almost two billion people -- and their gradual movement into the global economy. China, Malaysia, and Singapore are all entering the last stage of economic development and much of their success has been a result of foreign direct investment. "Foreign direct investment has played an important role in many -- but not all -- of the most successful development stories in countries such as Singapore and Malaysia, and even China," (Stiglitz 67). Advocates of the world economy suggest that the third world nations in sub-Saharan Africa and Central America follow these examples.

However, the relative "success" of the second world nations has come about through cooperation with tyrannical governments and the exploitation of the working class. By making a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bush, George W. "The National Security Strategy of the United States of America." Speeches delivered September 17 and June 1, 2002.

Downing, David. Capitalism: Political and Economic Systems. Chicago: Heinemann Library, 2003.

Friedman, Thomas L. The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding Globalization. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999.

Greenspan, Alan. "Banking in a Global World." Chicago: Delivered to the Conference on Bank Structure and Competition, May 6, 2004.
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Asian Literature Post Modern Literature

Words: 2434 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93376483

All year-round, the smells of a coffin and coffin nails hover over her. Great-Grandmother does not brush her teeth. Great-Grandmother does not believe in airplanes. Great-Grandmother does not watch television

Great-Grandmother simply stands in front of the window of her Garret, or sits in the sun, a sun that does not penetrate her but simply casts a shadow behind her. She is very pale and does her hair in an archaic fashion, and has a face that the narrator describes as a set of wrinkles with archeological significance.

Each family treats the situation with different tactics but all show an inherent disdain for the very old, to the point of seeing and treating them as if they are inhuman, and with an irreverent lack of respect that is contrary to the culture from which they came. The only piece that offers a consoling look at the very old, throughout is…… [Read More]

Bi Feiyu, John Balcom, trans. The Ancestor in Goldblatt, Howard ed. Chairman Mao Would Not Be Amused. New York: Grove Press. 1996.

Su Tong, Howard Golblatt, trans. The Brothers Shu, in Goldblatt, Howard ed. Chairman Mao Would Not Be Amused. New York: Grove Press. 1996.

Kawabata Yasunari, George Seito' trans. The Moon on the Water in Sonu Hwi, Marshall, Pihl, trans. Thoughts of Home, in Peter Lee Modern Korean Literature, Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, 1990, pgs 203-215.
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Rise of Modern Japan Contrary

Words: 964 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58520381

While women in Japan share the same legal rights as men, they're still largely subdued by a patriarchal society, not unlike the United tates. In conclusion, no singular analysis will provide the understanding and knowledge gained from a multi-faceted approach. Just as a human being is shaped and molded by the world around them, so too is a nation and a culture changed by known and unknown forces. The selected bibliography seeks to provide the reader with as wide an approach as possible.

Amagi, Yumiko. "Women and Political Institutions in Japan." JTOR. June 2001. Web. 7 Dec. 2010. .

Beasley, W.G. The Rise of Modern Japan. New York: t. Martin's, 2000. Print.

Buckley, andra. Encyclopedia of Contemporary Japanese Culture. London: Routledge, 2002. Print.

"CIA - the World Factbook." Welcome to the CIA Web ite -- Central Intelligence Agency. Web. 07 Dec. 2010. .

Huffman, James L. Modern Japan: an Encyclopedia…… [Read More]

Smith, Robert John. Japanese Society: Tradition, Self, and the Social Order. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1985. Print.

Varley, Paul H. Japanese Culture. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i, 2000. Print.

Yoshimoto, Mitsuhiro. Kurosawa: Film Studies and Japanese Cinema. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2000. Print.
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Survival Skills in Modern Society Work College

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30937674

Survival Skills in Modern Society: Work, College, And Daily Life

Back in the days of early man, human beings had three basic needs: food, shelter, and clothing. The human body has not changed much since these early days. However, human civilization has changed a great deal over history. Different survival skills are required to survive in modern times. Once upon a time, being a great hunter or a great warrior was what made someone 'talented' at survival. Today, we have no need to kill game or even grow our own food. Unless someone is serving in the military, the skill of fighting in combat is not required. We can buy our own food at the grocery store, drive where we need to go rather than walk on foot. We do not have to tell if a plant is poisonous or not before we eat it. We can search out medical…… [Read More]

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Post World War I Era

Words: 2253 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55780798

Post orld ar I era: Freud and Ortega y Gasset

The outbreak of orld ar I was a traumatic and disillusioning event for many people in Europe, perhaps most of all for those who had committed themselves to a notion of progress and advancement in human affairs. The sheer scale of the destruction and death unleashed by the war, which "exceeded that of all other wars known to history," at the end of a century which had been largely seen as one of peace, progress and prosperity, was a profound shock - one from which, it could be argued, the nations of Europe never entirely recovered.

hen the Austrian psycho-analyst Sigmund Freud sat down to write an article on the war in early 1915, it was this sense of disillusionment, of a loss of faith in progress, that was uppermost in his mind. The resulting essay, "Thoughts for the Times…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Freud, Sigmund, "Thoughts for the Times on War and Death" (1915), in Collected Papers: Volume IV (London: Hogarth Press, 1924).

Gilbert, Martin, First World War (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1994).

Ortega y Gasset, Jose, The Revolt of the Masses (English translation, New York: Norton, 1932; 2nd edn., 1957).

Pick, Daniel, War Machine: the Rationalization of Slaughter in the Modern Age (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1993).
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Post Modern Art Impressionism Was

Words: 690 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47536246

Now that the camera took over the task of copying reality of the world, the artist was free to play with his inner senses, perception, interpretation and changing effects.

On the other hand the industrialization, rapidly growing of the art world, that brought new approaches to paint, an oil colors. The new technology offered the artists more vivid colors than the ones the former painters had to prepare by themselves in their own studios, and this opened a gate to play with a new palette of bright colors and hues.

The industrialization brought more consequences than just the new paints and materials available.

The past-paced society gave a new sense of speed to everything. It seemed like an artist had to be fast-paced as well to keep up with the crazy rhythm of the mechanical society they lived in.

Painting became fast paced -or at least it seems that way…… [Read More]

References

Monan, Berence. (2006). Impressionism. Berlin: Broschiert Sprache.

Muller, Joseph-Emile. (1974). Impressionism. New York: Leon Amiel Publishers.

Pool, Phoebe. (1967). Impressionism in Europe. New York: Thames & Hudson.

Tinterow, Gary. (1994). Impressionism: Styles, Manner and Genres. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art.
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Atlantic World in the 18th Century

Words: 1498 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71652777

The increase in the productivity of the Atlantic market created a demand for tools that for use in production. The European farmers were obtaining the tools cheaply from these Afro-Asian areas

. Through the exchanges, it is true that the interactions were an avenue for the creation of an increase in trade opportunities in the Atlantic world.

Labor implications to the conflict

Sourcing for labor for the sugar industries was initially from the indigenous America but the increase in the demand for labor prompted the Europeans to source for labor in Africa. Africans, just like the Amerindians and other slaves were resistant to the forceful slavery. On this basis, quite a number of rebellions arose. Quite a number of the American and African natives who were resisting the forceful enslavement were killed; some of them ran away to places where they could not be found. The Spanish authorities were placing…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Coclanis, Peter A. 2005. The Atlantic Economy during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: Organization Operation, Practice and Personnel. Columbia, S.C.: Univ. Of South Carolina Press.

Goldstone, Jack A. 1991. Revolution and rebellion in the early modern world. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Klein. 2003. The Atlantic Slave Trade. Cambridge University press.

Klooster, Wim. 2010. Revolution in the Atlantic world: A Comparative History. NYU Press.
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African-American Fixation and Modern Superiority in Sports

Words: 1798 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37191607

African-American Fixation and Modern Superiority in Sports

Sports are significant in many ways to any individual of the society and their values can notarize any political ideology. Sports have often been considered as a missionary tool of liberation, as anti-hegemonic. Fascists, communists, liberal marketers and filibusters have always revered sports. Even political group of dissidents has also vituperated sports, paradoxically. Sports have marked itself as the most powerful form of human expression during all of man's time. Sadly, sports fail to serve the United States ideology in any ways people decided to define democratic values during this, the American Century, when we became the most powerful purveyors of sports in all history (Gerald Early, Performance And Reality Race, Sports and the Modern orld).

Race does not comprise of a system consisting of the privileged or discredited abilities. It is rather an entirety of clashing rumination of what it means to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gerald E. 17 Aug. 1998. Performance And Reality Race, Sports and the Modern World.

The Nation, Sports: A View From Left To Right.

The African-American Sports Fixation. Available on the address http://istsocrates.berkeley.edu/~africam/sportsfix.pdf. Accessed on 14 Mar. 2003.

Black Children Still Victimized By Savage Inequalities. Available on the address  http://www.blackcommentator.com/13_education.html . Accessed on 14 Mar. 2003.
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Ishi in Two Worlds Kroeber

Words: 1231 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25950844

Gradually, these diverse languages, culture, and customs began to become eradicated. Although she does not use the term, the anthropologist paints a picture of White usurpation of Indian territory a kind of cultural genocide, whether intentional or not. Clearly, Theodora Kroeber's aim in recording her dealings with Ishi is an attempt upon her part to undo this legacy of 'her' people.

Kroeber charts the course of the Ishi eradication through the eradication of the Ishi language. She notes that of the six main language groups of North American Indians, five of these were represented in the vast and expansive Western territory of what is now the state of California. According to her estimates, these five language groups divided themselves into over one hundred distinct spoken languages, an extraordinary diversity of languages on one continent, languages and cultures that are now lost to us.

One extraordinary testimony to Kroeber's achievement as…… [Read More]

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Race and World War II

Words: 1854 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2715907

All because of a racially fueled hatred that exaggerated the nature of the merciless war. This image of the cruelty and heartless Japanese is what eventually allowed the American people and government to justify the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

The racist attitudes clearly clouded the United State's commitment to defending Democracy, both abroad and within its own borders. One of the worst examples of this merciless prejudice was the removal of the Japanese from cities along the West Coast in Executive Order. The internment of hundreds of thousands of Japanese-Americans clearly threatened the mage of democracy here at home, in the U.S. borders. The research suggests that "after the American entry into the war against Japan, the U.S. military imposed curfews and other restrictions on persons of Japanese descent living on the West Coast, including both naturalized native American citizens, and eventually 'excluded' mot Japanese-Americans from certain Western…… [Read More]

References

Daniels, Roger. "Executive Order No. 9066." Modern American Poetry. University of Illinois. Web.  http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/g_l/haiku/9066.htm 

Dower, John. War without Mercy: Pacific War. Random House Digital. 2012.

Lie, John. Multiethnic Japan. Harvard University Press. 2004.

Primus, Richard A. The American Language of Rights. Cambridge University Press. 1999.
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Growth and Development World Inequality

Words: 1442 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87272264

Then, in 1000 a.D., Polynesian farmers colonized New Zeeland -- the group would break into two tribes, the Maori and the Moriori, who would later on collide (Diamond).

In 1500 a.D., Portuguese explorer Pedro Alvares Cabral discovered Brazil and claimed it as a territory for his country. The period also represented an ascension in arts, as numerous works, such as sculptures and cathedrals, had been completed. Books were being printed; advancements were being made in literacy and more focus was being placed on the learning process, with the opening of learning institutions; diplomatic services and approaches were gaining momentum; more inventions were being made and the first forms of copy right and patents emerged (Timeline). All these developments were however occurring in the more developed states, such as Spain, France, the Netherlands or Portugal.

Given this situation, as well as Diamond's theory of world evolution, it could be argued that…… [Read More]

References:

Diamond, J.M., 1997, Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, W.W. Norton

2009, Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, Barnes & Noble Website, http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?r=1&ean=0393038912 last accessed on September 25, 2009

Guns, Germs and Steel, About the Book, Jared Diamond, PBS, http://www.pbs.org/gunsgermssteel/about/jared.htmllast accessed on September 25, 2009

Jared Diamond: Why Is the World so Unequal? Yonsei University, Retrieved from www.yeh.pe.kr/s2/report_down.php?d_uid=160&PHPSESSID on September 26, 2009
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Demon-Haunted World Lighting the Candle

Words: 1734 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84584317

He is both likeable and credible in his delivery. His topic is one that arouses anger in many, because their faith does not allow them to see his truth. Is it only Sagan's truth? This analysis illustrates that through clear presentation, concise case building, appeal to emotion on a familiar level, and common values, that the truth belongs to everyone. He does not profess to have all the answers. The author simply points to the consequences of ignorance in the past and the possible penalty of ignorance for the future. He allows for counter argument and refutes each with clearly defined logic. He does not allow for organized religion, but he does allow for spirituality. He writes, "hen we recognize our place in an immensity of light-years and in the passage of ages, when we grasp the intricacy, beauty, and subtlety of life, then that soaring feeling, that sense of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Petraglia-Bahri, Joseph. Page on Greek Argument <

etrieved November 20, 2004 at http://www.sheftman.com/eng2f03/rhetoric.html

Sagan, Carl. The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark. Random House: New York. 1995.
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Naylor against world wide trading of weapons in Wages of Crime

Words: 829 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46353326

The foremost reason cited for pessimism with regard to global arms trading is technological smuggling, overseas systems’ reverse engineering, and the intense merchant rivalry when it comes to delivering more superior offset agreements, increasing advanced weapon manufacture capability worldwide. The above trend has brought about a significant decline in the need for buying on the global market (Naylor, 2004). One may witness synergy between trade of illegal imports, weapon proliferation and political revolts. On the face of it, an abrupt decrease was apparent in global arms trade following the Cold War. But if one delves deeper, one will find several reasons suggesting the weapon proliferation issue hasn’t dwindled similarly. One factor is, decreased measured weapon flow has accompanied a seeming growth in arms sales via the global black market that is not officially recorded.

Furthermore, a mere analysis of total value fails to account for the dangerous move in reasons…… [Read More]

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Is the Modern View of Nature Closer to the Ancient Than the Renaissance View

Words: 1602 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25231565

Nature Closer to the Ancient than the Renaissance View?

In his book, The Idea of Nature, Collingwood analyzes the principle characteristics of three periods of cosmological thinking in the history of European thought: Greek, Renaissance, and the Modern. By taking such an approach, Collingwood makes it possible for his readers to distinguish the similarities as well as fundamental differences between the modern view of Nature and that of Greek and Renaissance cosmology. But, perhaps Collingwood's work is more valuable because it demonstrates how both Greek and Renaissance schools of thought have made the modern view of nature possible. In other words, the modern view of nature has evolved from both Greek and Renaissance cosmology, with each period laying the foundation for the next to build on. To that extent, an assertion that the modern view of Nature more closely resemblances one period rather than another cannot, strictly speaking, be made…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Collingwood, R.G. "The Idea of Nature." Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1945.
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Problem With Modern Curricular Philosophy

Words: 4534 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94876598

History Of Theory Behind Curriculum Development

The evolution of curriculum theory by and large reflects the current of thought found in the academic-political landscape. The essence of the ancient maxim cuius regio, eius religio applies here: who reigns, his religion. In this case, who reigns, his curriculum. This has been true throughout all the centuries where education was deemed important by a group of individuals or a State. For example, in the West, the ancient Greeks (most notably Plato and Aristotle) devised a curriculum with the purpose of attaining knowledge and/or achieving "soundness" in the mind. Curricula are ever-tied to an aim -- and the objective of a curriculum may be ascertained by a review of what it contains or what its teachers hope to achieve. Therefore, the evolution of curriculum theory is related to the evolution of individual and societal objectives. Historically speaking, these objectives are manifest in every…… [Read More]

References

Adrian, J. (1999). Mere or More?: Classical Rhetoric and Today's Classroom.

University of North Carolina SITES, 131: 11-21.

Aquinas, T. (1942). Summa Theologica. [Fathers of the English Dominican Province

Trans.]. Retrieved from http://www.ccel.org/a/aquinas/summa/FP/FP068.html
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Toilet Design in Modern Society Public Toilets

Words: 3355 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7778469

Toilet Design

In modern society, public toilets has become a fixture wherever human activities take place; shopping malls, restaurants and filling stations all provide these places of convenience for travelers, diners and shoppers. However, when considering the nature and function of public toilets, many question their cleanliness and safety for public use. In addition, cultural and gender issues have also played a role in these debates. Women, for example, are obliged to make physical contact with public toilets, while this is not necessarily the case for men. In terms of cultural issues and sanitary concern, critics such as Isbit (2001) have suggested a toilet design whereby the human skin does not need to make any contact with the abode, but where both men and women squat to relieve themselves. To take these concerns into account, the history, background, and design of the public toilet should be considered in detail.

Historical…… [Read More]

References

A to Z. Of Manners & Etiquette. (2010) Toilet Etiquette. Retrieved from:  http://www.a-to-z-of-manners-and-etiquette.com/toilet-etiquette.html 

Biddle, S. (2010, Aug 27). The Long, Unglamorous History of the Toilet. Gizmodo. Retrieved from:  http://gizmodo.com/5622088/the-long-unglamorous-history-of-the-toilet 

Brain, M. (2011). How Toilets Work. How Stuff Works, Inc. Retrieved from:  http://home.howstuffworks.com/toilet4.htm 

Clark, E. (2011) 3 Serious Concerns About Hygiene in Public Restrooms Revealed in Survey. Ezine Articles. Retrieved from: http://ezinearticles.com/?3-Serious-Concerns-About-Hygiene-in-Public-Restrooms-Revealed-in-Survey&id=46579
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Why There Is No Objective Justice in Today S World

Words: 1059 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65263145

Blind" Justice In The Modern Era

There are three different types of justice that can be understood within the frame of the readings: revenge, eye for an eye, and advantageous justice (the outcome is beneficial for society). hile justice is an abstract notion that all can, to some extent, agree is a good thing -- in reality, the exercise of justice is less certain, regardless of the type. Indeed, in many cases, the type of justice that one pursues has a fundamentally subjective character to it, whereas objective justice is often missing from the public discourse. The reasons for the lack of objective justice could stem back to the erection of the modern era, when Lady Justice herself became "blindfolded" as Miller notes (2). hy should justice be blind? Does that not mean that it cannot see what the object that it intends to strike? Such are the questions that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dunne, Dominic. "Oil, Money, and Mystery." YouTube. Web. 20 Sep 2015.

Miller, William Ian. Eye for an Eye. NY: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Print.

Thucydides. On Justice, Power, and Human Nature. IN: Hackett Publishing, 1993.

Print.
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Application of Genesis 12 10-20 in the Contemporary World

Words: 2551 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36035912

Genesis 12:10-20 and the Modern World:

Genesis 12:10-20 is a text about Abram and Sarai in Egypt that is considered as one of the great epos narrated in the ook of Genesis. efore the narration of this story, Abram is portrayed as an individual with several positive attributes including righteousness and humility. However, the story highlights several troubling concerns and questions regarding Abram's character, beliefs, and behaviors in relation to God and Sarai. These troubling questions and concerns have become the subject of interest and study throughout the ages. Actually, the concerns have been examined in various commentaries, adaptations and interpretations, and plot extensions. The story has mainly been examined from two schools of thought starting with a description of Sarai's beauty, attractiveness, and sexuality from the male perspective

. The second school of thought is typical expressions of male sexual discourse in light of Abram's disturbing behavior. Therefore, Genesis…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Cochran, Brian T. "Genesis 12:10-20: "The Struggle to Walk by Faith" Redeemer Reformation

Church, April 22, 2014,  http://storage.cloversites.com/reginapresybeterianchurch/documents/Gen.%2012.10-20.pdf 

Deffinbaugh, Robert L. "When Faith Fails & #8230; (Genesis 12:10-13:41)." Bible.org. Last Modified May 12, 2004.  http://bible.org/seriespage/when-faith-fails-8230-genesis-1210-1341 

Enhancements to Inductive Bible Study. InterVarsity/USA Bible Study Task Force. Last Modified April 1999. http://www.intervarsity.org/sites/default/files/uploaded/bible-studies/communal/enhancements_to_ibs.doc
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Rooster Motif in Modern Art

Words: 1622 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39760091

auchenberg and Shochat

Shochat and auschenberg: Challenging Taboos

auschenberg's "Odalisk" (1955-58) and Shochat's "Johanan and the ooster, 2010" are separated by half a century and yet both works reflect one another artistically, in terms of style, theme and ideas. "Odalisk" is a parody of the 19th century portrait "La Grande Odalisque" by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, which depicts a nude Turkish concubine reclining on a bed peering over her shoulder at the viewer. auschenberg's composition (a collaged box standing one-legged on a pillow, a rooster perched atop the box, almost peering over its shoulder at the viewer) is a satirical glance backwards at the art which came before it -- and a comment on the sexual themes and intonations of the modern world. Similarly, Shochat's "Johanan" is a biting commentary on modern sexual mores -- a semi-nude man holding a rooster (i.e., cock) in an unabashed pronouncement of masculine sexuality…… [Read More]

Reference List

Johnson, Paul. Art: A New History. NY: HarperCollins, 2003.

Rauschenberg, R. (1955-58). Odalisk. Comines. Retrieved from http://mediation.centrepompidou.fr/education/ressources/ens-rauschenberg-en/ens-rauschenberg-en.htm

Shochat, T. (2010). Johanan and the Rooster.

Weaver, R. (1984). Ideas Have Consequences. IL: University of Chicago.
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Exemplary Leadership Practices in Modern Organizations

Words: 906 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35862061

The modern educational environment is constantly changing, particularly because of the rapid changes in today’s society. In light of these changes, educational leadership is an essential component towards enhancing teaching practice and the nature of the learning environment. Educational leaders in today’s learning environment are faced with the need to improve their leadership skills in order to enhance their effectiveness in shaping pedagogy for educators. The development of leadership skills by educational leaders requires the application of leadership principles for the 21st Century. James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner published a book entitled The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations, which provides important leadership skills that can be utilized by modern educational leaders.

Overview and Summary of the Authors’ Main Points

The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations was written by James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner to provide insights…… [Read More]

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Picasso The Image of Modern Man Picasso

Words: 1523 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74434811

Picasso: The Image of Modern Man

Picasso came to Paris from Malaga, Spain, a town known for its bull-fighters. Picasso in his less experimental days he depicted these bull fights in a number of pencil sketches that captured the flare, dynamism and thrill of the arena. However, he never content to simply reflect in a realistic way the world around him. Society was changing the very first years of the 20th century: the modern world had lived through the Reformation, the Revolution and Industrialization. Now it was becoming a world where new socialistic and atheistic ideologies were competing with old world beliefs still being clung to by certain leaders (like Franco in Spain, for instance). Picasso saw the importance of fashion and trends in this new age of modern art. In the first years of the 20th century, he painted in blues -- then in pinks (the Rose Period) --…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Greenberg, C. "Avant-Garde and Kitsch." Partisan Review, Vol. 6, No. 5 (1939): 34-

49. Print.

Johnson, Paul. Art: A New History. NY: HarperCollins, 2003. Print.

Picasso, Pablo. Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. 12 Apr 2013. Web.
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Cast Away 2000 A Modern

Words: 1155 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46002275

' Either way, things can never be as they 'once were.' Chuck is filled with a great sense of loss, as he feels as if he has lost Kelly twice in his life, which is almost too much to bear. The worst struggle, emotionally, for Chuck is that he knows that he could actually be a better husband to Kelly now, after the crash, than he could have been before he was stranded. Before he nearly lost his life and spent so many years alone, he took human relationships for granted. He was always focused on the next task the next thing he had to do for his job. Now Chuck realizes that the most important things in life are not things, but people. He also has a new-found appreciation for the natural world that sustained him for four years, alone on the island.

Chuck, uncertain as to what do,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cast away. Starring Tom Hanks. 2000.
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Disaster Plan in the Modern Era it

Words: 816 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4811502

Disaster Plan

In the modern era, it is important that government from the federal to the local level have risk management plans in place for natural disasters, man-made issues and of course, terrorism. Generally speaking, risk management helps identify, prioritize and put plans in place regarding areas of risk that can impact the community. The overall purpose of risk management is so that agencies can be proactive in their identification and implementing plans for disasters and risks since in the modern world these plans involve numerous agencies and complex coordination. Thankfully, standards have been developed that organize risk management by looking at six general paradigms: 1) Identifying risks in the context of the area (e.g. flood planning is less important in Arizona than in Louisiana); 2) Planning a process to mitigate the situation (who is in charge); 3) Mapping the objectives of stakeholders (who will be involved); 4) Developing a…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Colorado Division of Emergency Management. (2013). News, Info and Preparedness.

Retrieved from:  http://www.coemergency.com/ 

Drabek, T., et.al.. (1991). Emergency Management: Principles and Practices for Local Government. International City Management Association.

Frenkel, M., Hommel, U., & Rudolf, M. (Eds.). (2005). Risk Management - Challenge and Opportunity. New York: Springer.
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Surviving the Irrational World The Fight or

Words: 1864 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98415328

Surviving the Irrational orld: the "Fight or Flight" Instinct in Angela's Ashes and Catch-22

Both Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt and Catch-22 by Joseph Heller are novels set during the time of II. Both authors use satire to examine a world that has abandoned the rule of law and now faces life in what might be called "survival mode." Indeed, if one theme may be said to unite the two works it is the theme of "fight or flight" as a survival instinct. As Meridel Le Sueur states, "Survival is a form of resistance," and it is resistance to an encroaching environment of totalitarianism (in Catch-22) and the breakdown of social order (in Angela's Ashes) that propels the protagonists of each work to fend for themselves and secure their own survival. In other words, they "fight" and "flee" as they illustrate a principle of Thomas Carlyle: "Permanence, perseverance and persistence…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Heller, Joseph. Catch-22. NY: Simon and Schuster, 2004. Print.

Koontz, Harold. Essentials of Management. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill, 2008.

Print.

Le Sueur, Meridel. [qtd in] Women in Search of Literary Space [ed. Gudrun Grabher].
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Attacks on the World Trade

Words: 3951 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9666752



Emergency management is also a vital part to the planning for a disaster. Training will have to be conducted at periodic intervals to maintain the preparedness of the emergency response team and to evaluate the condition and the operational difficulties if any that may arise due to the equipment being used. The procedures will have to be critiqued and constantly evaluated to determine if a better, safer or more efficient method can be used in the procedure. A clean up task force will also have to be set up to help clean and restore the area to as near as possible, its pre-disaster state. Sufficient funds will have to be allocated to keep the emergency response team properly outfitted. An emergency fund may also be required to be set up to take care of the clean up activities that may be required. This fund would have to be very liquid…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Sykes, L., Richards, P., Kim W-Y., Armitage, J., Jacob, K., & Lerner-Lam, Art. (2001) Seismograms recorded by LCSN Station PAL (Palisades, NY) New York, Columbia University. Retrieved February 18, 2008 at  http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/LCSN/Eq/20010911_wtc.html 

TRADE. (2008). The Training Resources and Data Exchange Washington, D.C., FEMA. Retrieved February 18, 2008, at http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/nfa/trade/index.shtm

LLIS. (2008) Lessons Learned Information Shared Washington, D.C., Department of Homeland Security, Retrieved February 18, 2008, from http://www.llis.dhs.gov/index.do

RKB. (2008) Responder Knowledge Base. Washington, D.C., Department of Homeland Security, Retrieved February 18, 2008, from http://www.rkb.us