Psychodynamic Approach Essays (Examples)

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Psychodynamic Paradigm

Words: 532 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30045694

Psychodynamic Approach or Paradigm

The Psychodynamic Approach incorporates theories and methods originating with Freud and expanded by his followers. Freud's original approach was referred to as Psychoanalysis; which can be considered both a theory as well as a therapy method. The Psychodynamic Approach is founded upon the influence that internal processes and past experience have in determining a person's personality. These theorists believe that behavior is driven by individual's unconscious urges not necessarily rational thought. One intuitive illustration of this can be found in the contemporary field of marketing. Advertisements rarely appeal to the rational side of consumers by offering information about products; instead they target to the emotional needs and wants of individuals (Samuel, 2010).

Freud's theories developed from interactions what his patients during treatment sessions. These interactions led Freud to believe that adult behavior is driven by instinctual impulses and desires that originated in their childhood. Most of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boag, S. (2010). Repression, suppression, and conscious awareness. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 164-181.

Samuel, L. (2010). Freud on Madison Avenue: Motivation Research and Subliminal Advertising in America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Taylor, E. (2009). The Mystery of Personality: A History of Psychodynamic Theories. New York: Springer.
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Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches to Personality Psychodynamic

Words: 1656 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20697898

Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches to Personality

Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches

Personality can be defined as the unique characteristics that various individuals possess. These characteristics differentiate individuals from others. In other words, personality can also be defined as a unique system of feelings, thoughts and behaviors that prevail over time and that is evident in various situations. Different psychologists have determined different approaches to study personality. Some psychologists try to examine various aspects of personality that an individual possesses, whereas, others try to understand why there are differences in the personalities of various individuals. (Morris et al., 2010)

Listed below are the two different approaches to personality;

Psychodynamic Approach

Psychodynamic theories establish the thought that our personality is an outcome of inner psychological forces which are not under the control of our conscious mind. Psychodynamic approach basically studies the energy of our unconscious mind and it also explores how this energy…… [Read More]

References

Morris, C. And Maisto, A. (2010). Understanding Psychology . Oxford: Orford University Press. pp.45-65. http://ftp.cleary.edu [Accessed: 11 Jun 2013].

Unknown. (2008). Theoretical Perspectives on Human Behavior. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publishers. pp.53-65. http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/36524_PE_Chapter2.pdf [Accessed: 11 Jun 2013].

Unknown. (2005). Personality. Thousand Oaks: Cluj-Napoca: University of Medicine and Pharmacy. pp.1-5.  http://psychiatry-psychology.ro/file/Stiintele%20Comportamentului%20ENG/Lecture6_Personality.pdf  [Accessed: 11 Jun 2013].
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Psychodynamic Therapy or Counseling

Words: 1702 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42098470

Psychodynamic therapy is an approach to counseling that was introduced by Sigmund Freud whose work in psychoanalytic counseling was influenced by his jealous and bitter feelings towards his younger brother and his Jewish heritage that emphasized in-depth analysis. Unlike some therapy approaches, psychodynamic therapy focuses on an in-depth analysis of an individual's thoughts while seemingly ignoring the trappings of science. In addition, this approach primarily focuses on the unconscious based on its role in human development and psychological problems. Consequently, this approach to counseling facilitates an in-depth analysis of a person's psychological problems given that the root of our problems emanate from our past. Therefore, psychodynamic therapy is a suitable approach to counseling that can be further understood through the four quadrants in integral theory.

Overview of Psychodynamic Therapy

Psychodynamic therapy is commonly known as psychoanalytic therapy and examines personality and psychological problems in terms of the unconscious. This therapy…… [Read More]

References

Bornstein, R. (2013). The Psychodynamic Perspective. Retrieved October 26, 2016, from  http://nobaproject.com/modules/the-psychodynamic-perspective 

Esbjorn-Hargens, S. (2009, March 12). An Overview of Integral Theory. Retrieved October 26, 2016, from http://integrallife.com/integral-post/overview-integral-theory

Ivey, A. E., D'Andrea, M. J., & Ivey, M. B. (2012). Theories of counseling and psychotherapy. A multicultural perspective. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Inc.
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Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Does Not Go Down Easily

Words: 1496 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85397091

Psychodynamic and Humanistic Theory

Psychodynamic & Humanistic Theory

A seminal study on the personality trait differences of therapists practicing with different theoretical orientations is an interesting place to begin this compare and contrast discussion. Tremblay, et al. (1986) administered the Personality Orientation Inventory to 90 male and 90 female psychotherapists who self-designated and were equally distributed in groups designated as behavioral (BEH), psychodynamic (PSY), and humanistic (HUM). Interestingly, the study suggested that a core therapist personality exists and that further distinction can be achieved through consideration of the patterns of personality that were associated with theoretical orientation. The caveat was that the patterns associated with theoretical orientations were characterized more by overlapping traits than unique traits. Of the three theoretical categories, the HUM group exhibited the most unique traits: they were more flexible, more accepting of personal aggression and expressing feelings in action, and differed in their development of intimate…… [Read More]

References

Boreman, D. (2010, November). The Science of Psychology. Chapter 10 Personality. Retreived from http://www.mesacc.edu/~edmny04781/psy101_oc/Chapter_10.pdf

Leichsenring, F. & Leibing, E. (2003). The effectiveness of psychodynamic therapy and cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of personality disorders: A meta analysis. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 160(7), 1223-1232. Retrieved from http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.ajp.160.7.1223

Shedler, J. (2010, February-March). The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy. American Psychologist, 65(2), 98-109. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/amp-65-2-98.pdf

Tremblay, J.M., Herron, W.G. & Schultz, C.L. (1986). Relation between therapeutic orientation and personality in psychotherapists. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 17(2), 106-110. Retrieved at http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0735-7028.17.2.106
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Psychodynamic Model the Model's Developmental Processes and

Words: 2966 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1938969

Psychodynamic Model, The Model's Developmental Processes, And Use In Assessment And Treatment Psychodynamic Model

A large proportion of this research relied on historical data. Most of the data originated from institutions that take care of the aged, books, and journal articles. The views of health experts and professionals in mental health also shaped the judgement of this paper. The paper focused on extracting information from the four models under its analysis. Most of the findings originated from the four frameworks. ( The psychodynamic, the cognitive behavior, the stress and coping model, and the family systems model).

Given the demographics of the present age, almost all adult mental shape practice will certainly include older adults. As people grow older, various changes occur, more valuable is the vulnerability to stress and illnesses. The challenges one faces through the years like the death of loved ones, loneliness and others exposes one to the…… [Read More]

ReferencesTop of For

Top of F

Blaikie, A. (2009). Ageing And Popular Culture. Cambridge U.A.: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Kerry Kelly, N., & Jack, N. (n.d). A New Model of Techniques for Concurrent Psychodynamic

Work with Parents of Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Patients. Child And
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Psychodynamic Counselors Facilitate Change In Order to

Words: 2851 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3925431

psychodynamic counselors facilitate change?

In order to understand how psychodynamic counselors facilitate change through a therapeutic relationship with their client, it is worth discussing what psychodynamic therapy is, how it is used, how it originated, and who some of its most notable founders were. Towards the end of this document, in the description of how psychodynamic therapy is used, descriptions of recent psychodynamic therapy sessions that the author undertook in a triad setting will be described.

The mind, personality, and psyche are terms that refer to the interrelationships of a person's mental, emotional, or what could be termed psychological characteristics. Another way to think of this is that the psyche, mind, and personality are the forces that drive a person to think what they do, to act out how they choose, the way a person relates to themselves and how they relate to the world around them particularly the role…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bowlby, John 1999, Attachment and Loss: Vol I, 2nd Ed. Basic Books, New York.

"Depth Psychology" Stepping Stones: bringing depth psychology to everyday life [online] viewed March 23, 2011, www.depthpsychologytoday.com.

Gay, P 1989, The Freud Reader, W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., New York.

Hall, CS 1954, A Primer in Freudian Psychology. Meridian Books, New York.
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Psychodynamic Coaching in the Workplace

Words: 1632 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63326967

Systemic Psychodynamic Coaching in the Workplace:

Workplace coaching is a term that refers to the process of equipping people in the working environment with necessary tools, opportunities, and knowledge for total development in order to enhance their effectiveness from an individual, organizational, and work perspective. Workplace coaching has emerged as a major concept in modern organizations since leaders, researchers, and organizations have identified it as a crucial competency in leadership and management (Cacioppe, n.d.). The increase in this practice has also been attributed to the fact that employees continue to request for coaching. As an important competency in leadership and management, workplace coaching has assumed different perspectives and approaches because of the existence of various coaching models such as Systemic Psychodynamic Coaching model.

The Concept of Workplace Coaching:

As previously mentioned, the concept of workplace coaching can be defined as the knowledge, skills, and processes through which people engage themselves…… [Read More]

References:

Azmatullah, S. (2013). The coach's mind manual: enhancing coaching practice with neuroscience, psychology and mindfulness. New York, NY: Routledge

Beck, U.C. (2011). Psychodynamic coaching: focus and depth. Great Britain: The Studio

Publishing Services Ltd.

Cacioppe, R. (n.d.). Why Workplace Coaching and Why Now? Retrieved May 19, 2014, from  http://www.integral.org.au/why-coaching-in-the-workplace-and-why-now
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Psycho Dynamic and Cultural Leadership Approaches

Words: 1280 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35721494

Leadership Approaches

Psychodynamic Approach Survey

This is approach to leadership is based on personality study and change by the leader and those who are under leadership. According to Psychodynamic Approach Survey, a leader is a person who is supposed to learn from analyzing and realizing the personality and reaction of the people who are being led so that he or she can know how best to handle them. A leader who has borrowed from the Psychodynamic Approach Survey is not worried of how the followers perceive him and understand him. He is not interested in how to change his personality so that he or she can appeal to the people. Nonetheless, such a leader is focused on observing the behaviors and the personalities of the followers, making sure that he captures the way they react, think, interact, and do everything, as a basis for influencing them to act in a…… [Read More]

References

McIntosh, G. L. & Rima, S. D. (2007). Overcoming the Dark Side of Leadership: The Paradox of Personal Dysfunction. New York. Baker Books

Nohria, N. & Khurana, R. (2013). Handbook of Leadership Theory and Practice: An HBS Centennial Colloquium on Advancing Leadership. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press

Northouse, P. G. (2012). Leadership: Theory and Practice. New York: SAGE Publications
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Clinical Psychology Psychodynamic Cognitive-Behavioral Humanistic

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71685561

Also known as person-centered or client-centered, Rogerian therapy, it "places much of the responsibility for the treatment process on the client, with the therapist taking a nondirective role" Person-centered therapy, 2009, Mind disorders). However, although effective with some clients: "Person-centered therapy, however, appears to be slightly less effective than other forms of humanistic therapy in which therapists offer more advice to clients and suggest topics to explore," as the client may use the therapy sessions more to complain or go over old grievances, than use the therapy to move forward in his or her life (Person-centered therapy, 2009, Mind disorders).

Another type of therapy that has radically escalated in popularity is that of family or marital therapy, which, like cognitive-behavioral therapy, tends to be focused on specific problems and of a fairly short duration. "Marriage and family therapists regularly practice short-term therapy; 12 sessions on average" FAQs, 2009, AAMFT). The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

FAQs about marriage and family therapy. (2009). American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://www.aamft.org/faqs/index_nm.asp

Mulhauser, Greg. (2009). An introduction to cognitive therapy and cognitive-behavioral approaches. Counseling Resource. Retrieved February 28, 2009 at http://counsellingresource.com/types/cognitive-therapy/

Park, C. (2006, October 18). Best evidence summaries of topics in mental healthcare.

BEST in MH clinical question-answering service.
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parents'sexuality and the psychoanalysis or psychodynamic

Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27707475

1. As people progress through the stages of psychosocial development, they may get fixated due to suppressed desires. As all desires is driven by libido, according to Freud, any fixation can become a sexual fixation. Thus, being fixated at the oral stage would theoretically predispose one to have some type of oral fetish. Abnormal sexual behavior can be traced to fixation or stagnation, a neurosis that is due to a previous difficulty at one of the stages of development.

Freud’s theory is interesting, certainly, and has its own internal logic. However, Freud’s model is not at all scientific. Freud also focused almost exclusively on male libido, being personally perplexed by female sexual desire and by women in general (“Modules on Freud: On Psychosexual Development,” n.d.). Without any substantial research to back up his theories, Freud’s work remains theoretical. Therefore, I do not necessarily agree with the details of the theory.…… [Read More]

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Approaching Bowenian Family System Therapy

Words: 2235 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81484788

Experiential Family Therapy (EFT) is the central place of humanistic therapies and psychology. This therapy includes the works of Fritz Perls, Carl Rogers, and Abraham Maslow, along with the communication theories and family systems of Paul Watzlavick, Don Jackson, and Gregory ateson. It is called a meeting place for all the theorists because clearly the experiential family therapy includes multiple systems used for therapy. The authors ecvar & evcar (2006) like to call these 'experimental approaches to family therapy' instead of 'experimental models'. Virginia Satir, one of the main predecessors of the experiential approach, is also considered to be part of communication approaches as well as experiential (Lester, 2009).

The family tree of the family system has three main parts: (1) the Communications approach of Virginia Satir; (2) the Gestalt experiential approach of Walter Kempler; and (3) the Symbolic experiential approach of Carl Whitaker (ecvar & ecvar, 2006). However, the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Becvar, D.S. & Becvar, R.J. (2006). Family therapy: A systemic integration. Boston, MA: Pearson

Broderick, P., & Weston, C. (2009). Family Therapy with a Depressed Adolescent. NCBI, 32-37. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2719446/ 

Greenburg, L.S., Watson, J.C., & Lietaer, G. (1998). Handbook of experiential psychotherapy. New York: Guilford

Israelstam, K. (1988). Contrasting four major family therapy paradigms: implications for family therapy training. Journal of Family Therapy, 179-196.
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Compare Role Bowenian Therapist Psychodynamic Therapist Recently Years Thank

Words: 1454 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88684999

Psychodynamic Therapy vs Bowenian Therapy

Psychodynamic Vs Bowenian Therapist

Psychodynamic and Bowenian Therapist

ole of Psychodynamic Therapist to that of the Bowenian Therapist

Psychodynamic Therapy

Psychodynamic Sessions

ole of the Psychodynamic therapist

Bowenian Therapist

Family Systems Theory

Goals of the Therapy

ole of the Therapist

Advantages

Psychodynamic Therapy

Psychodynamic therapy focuses on helping the patients to explore the feelings and emotions that are deep inside them. These are the emotions that they might not be aware of. Psychodynamic therapy helps the people to understand how these hidden feelings and emotions are effecting there moods and behavior without them knowing about it.

Psychodynamic therapy is also known as Insight-oriented therapy, which makes the people understand the reasons for their current behavior and mood swings which might be the outcome of some past relationships that have been a cause of constant pain for them.

Psychodynamic therapy is the oldest of all the…… [Read More]

References

Galica, J. (2013). Theravive . Bowenian Family Systems Theory and Therapy.

Haggerty, J. (2013, april 3). Psych Central. Psychodynamic Therapy.
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Bowenian Therapist to That of the Psychodynamic

Words: 998 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88896282

Bowenian Therapist to that of the Psychodynamic Therapist

Bowenian Therapist vs. Psychodynamic Therapist: oles Comparison

In this text, I seek to compare the role of psychodynamic therapists with that of Bowenian therapists. However, in seeking to compare the said roles, it would be prudent to first offer a brief definition of the two theories. egarded one of the most comprehensive and perhaps earliest family systems functioning theories, "Bowen family systems theory is a theory of human behavior that views the family as an emotional unit and uses systems thinking to describe the complex interactions in the unit" (Brok and Saks 2008, p.135). Psychodynamic therapy in the words of Haggerty (2006) "focuses on unconscious processes as they are manifested in a person's present behavior."

To begin with, while many psychodynamic therapists as the National Center for Biotechnological Information - U.S. National Library of Medicine (2013) observes work with clients having substance-abuse…… [Read More]

References

Brok, M.G. & Saks, S. (2008). Contemporary Issues in Family Law and Mental Health. Illinois: Charles C. Thomas Publisher.

Galica, J. (2013). Bowenian Family Systems Theory and Therapy. Retrieved July 2, 2013, from:  http://www.theravive.com/research/Bowenian-Family-Systems-Theory-and-Therapy 

Haggerty, J. (2006). Psychodynamic Therapy. Retrieved July 2, 2013, from: http://psychcentral.com/lib/2006/psychodynamic-therapy/

National Center for Biotechnological Information - U.S. National Library of Medicine (2013). Chapter 7 -- Brief Psychodynamic Theory. Retrieved July 2, 2013, from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64952/
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Clinical Psychology Approaches of the

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72560358



In contrast to dynamic or behavioral models, humanistic therapy places the patient (or "client") in the center of the session. This often relegates the therapist to a coaching role or, even more passively, to serve as an example of sincere interest in the client's chosen direction. Since the goal is often to build self-esteem (Branden, 1994, p. 1), this gives the client (for example, a timid child or neglected widow) experience with supportive, open relationships that may have been absent from prior life.

With its roots in intervention-oriented social work, family systems therapy has evolved into a sophisticated theoretical approach in its own right. By seeking the source of disturbances in the relationships between family members and other individuals, family therapists often derive insight from studying how two or more people -- any one of whom may be the putative "patient" (Barnhill, 1979, p. 94) -- transmit information and emotional…… [Read More]

References

Aveline, M. (2001). Very brief dynamic psychotherapy. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 7, pp. 373-380.

Barnhill, L.R. (1979). Healthy family systems. The Family Coordinator, 28(1), pp. 94-100.

Bateman, a., Brown, D. & Pedder, J. (2000). Introduction to psychotherapy: An outline of psychodynamic principles and practice. 3rd edition. New York: Brunner-Routledge.

Branden, N. Working with self-esteem in psychotherapy. Directions in Clinical Psychology, 4(8), pp. 1-6.
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Theoretical Approaches There Are Several Theoretical Approaches

Words: 1421 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64245594

Theoretical Approaches:

There are several theoretical approaches that have been developed by different personality theorists that focus on explaining the uniqueness of individuals. These theories have particularly been developed in the field of personality psychology that includes some popular thinkers or theorists like Sigmund Freud. Since these theories provide different approaches to understanding personality, they have been classified into different categories based on their focus and the psychologists who developed them. Some of the most common categories of personality theories include biological, behavioral, psychodynamic, trait, and humanistic and existential theories. In addition, some of the most common theoretical approaches in the personality psychology field include dispositional, learning, psychodynamic, and humanistic and existential theories or approaches.

Dispositional Theories:

The development of dispositional theories can be attributed to the work of Gordon Allport who stressed on the distinctiveness of the individual unlike any other personality theorist. Allport focused on an individual's uniqueness…… [Read More]

References:

Feist, J. & Feist, G. (2009). Theories of personality (7th ed., pp.373-437). New York, NY:

McGraw-Hill Education.

Woodward, W.M. (n.d.). Humanistic-Existential Theory: A Group Theory Paper. Retrieved April 29, 2013, from  http://www.thedivinesoul.net/pdfdocuments/humanisticexistentialtheory.pdf
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Different Therapeutic Approaches

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58530119

Therapeutic Approaches

Different Therapeutic Approaches and a Diversity of Clients

The prolific nature of theory generation makes it difficult for a therapist to choose a single approach with regard to a specific client type. Cave (1999) listed the "broad" categories of theory as somatic (medical interventions), psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic. Under these broad headings are many different subsets of theory that can be used to treat a specific type of malady.

However, this proliferation does offer one benefit to the therapist searching for an approach. Since the diagnostic and statistical manual offers so many choices with regard to disease, the therapist needs just as many avenues for treatment. When the number of possible diagnoses are coupled with the range of different personality types, it can be even more difficult to find an effective therapy. But, at least the choices are there. And if the choice is not available, it…… [Read More]

References

Baradon, T. (2010). Relational trauma in infancy: Psychoanalytic, attachment and neuropsychological contributions to parent-infant psychotherapy. London: Taylor & Francis.

Cave, S. (1999). Therapeutic approaches in psychology. London: Psychology Press.

Paniagua, F.A. (2005). Assessing and treating culturally diverse clients: A practical guide. Grand rapids, MI: SAGE.

Trepper, T.S., & Barrett, M.J. (1989). Systematic treatment of incest: A therapeutic handbook. London: Psychology Press.
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Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Words: 3177 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56691092

Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Personality is defined as a person's exceptional deviation on the general evolutionary design for human temperament. A personality trait refers to a durable disposition to act in a certain manner in different situations. Personality traits represent some of the most significant sets of individual disparities in organizations. It is the comparatively set of psychological characteristics that differentiates one person from another. People should strive to comprehend fundamental personality attributes and the manner in which they influence a person's behavior (Griffin 2007).Most perspectives to personality presuppose that some traits are more fundamental compared to others. This concept underlie that a small number of basic personality traits determine other, more superficial traits. With respect to the biological approach to personality, personality traits are determined by human genetic inheritance, behavioral tendencies that develop from evolutionary history and human conduct that generate through intricate biological…… [Read More]

References

Andrewes, D. (2001). Neuropsychology: From theory to practice. New York: Psychology Press.

Ashton, Q. (2012). Advances in Nervous System Research and Application: 2011 Edition. New York: Scholarly Editions.

Carducci, B. (2009). The psychology of personality: Viewpoints, research and applications.

London: John Wiley & Sons.
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Therapeutic Theories and Approaches

Words: 3343 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72461076

Morgan's Case Study

Morgan is a bi-racial 16-year-old adolescent male whose mother is Japanese-American and the father is African-American. His parents divorced when he was 3 years old and have negative feelings towards each other even though they both love him. Morgan's parents have remarried and have children. He has very good relationships with his father, stepmother, and younger sisters but has struggled to have a good relationship with his mother after she remarried. The family situation is quite stressful since it's difficult for Morgan to see his mother who relocated to another state while the father lost his job and the family is experiencing tremendous financial challenges. While Morgan has developed feelings for one young woman in his social group, he is skeptical of asking her out on a date for fear of rejection. In the past year, he has demonstrated behavioral changes including identifying himself as African-American instead…… [Read More]

References

Counseling Staff. (2015, June 1). Five Counseling Theories and Approaches. Retrieved from The Family Institute at Northwestern University website:  http://counseling.northwestern.edu/five-counseling-theories-and-approaches/ 

Han, H.S., West-Olatunji, C. & Thomas, M.S. (2011). Use of Racial Identity Development Theory to Explore Cultural Competence among Early Childhood Educators. SRATE Journal, 20(1), 1-11.

Ivey, A. E., D'Andrea, M. J., & Ivey, M. B. (2012). Theories of counseling and psychotherapy. A multicultural perspective. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Inc.

Jones-Smith, E. (2012). Theories of counseling and psychotherapy: an integrative approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications Inc.
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Psychology - Treatment Approaches Major

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63918182



Paranoid/Schizoid personality disorders are difficult to treat via insight-oriented therapeutic approaches, mainly because the patient is prone to doubt the motives of the therapist by virtue of the nature of the symptoms of the disease itself: namely, paranoid delusions that convince the patient that the therapist is part of a larger "conspiracy" against the patient (Shapiro 1999).

Narcissistic, histrionic, borderline, and antisocial disorders are treatable via several insight-oriented, one-on-one psychoanalytic psychotherapeutic approaches conducted by specialists in those types of disorders, as are many obsessive-compulsive and avoidant disorders (Gerrig and Zimbardo 2005). Alternatively, obsessive- compulsive, dependant, and especially, avoidant disorders are treatable in group settings as well. Avoidant and dependent personality disorders, in particular, may be best-suited to cognitive behavioral therapeutic approaches where the roots of the patient's disorder relates to distorted self-perceptions capable of being addressed directly (Coleman, Butcher and Carson 1994).

Where paranoid or schizophrenic personality disorders are associated…… [Read More]

References

Coleman, J., Butcher, J., and Carson, R. (1994). Abnormal Psychology and Human Life. Dallas: Scott, Foresman & Co.

Gerrig, R., Zimbardo, P. (2005).

Psychology and Life 18th Ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Shapiro, D. (1999). Neurotic Styles. New York: Basic Books.
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Five Approaches and Theory

Words: 1259 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63575368

ole of Theory in Qualitative esearch

Five Approaches and Theory

Compare and contrast the role of theory in the five main qualitative approaches:

Ethnography, case study, narrative, phenomenology, grounded theory

Although all five major approaches to qualitative research embrace theory to some degree or another, not all of them value the use of theory to the same degree. Broadly speaking, some cultural 'theory' is usually demonstrated within an ethnography, either through a comparative approach; an attempt to understand the culture on its own terms; a theory that seeks to understand the multiple layers of meaning within the culture in a symbolic fashion; or even a universalizing construct like feminist or Marxist theory. The extent to which this theoretical approach is emphasized will depend upon the anthropologist conducting the study. Some studies may mainly focus upon observations and detail unique aspects of a foreign culture while other studies might largely subsume…… [Read More]

References

Ethnography. (2013). Colorado State University Writing Guides. Retrieved:

http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1345

Grounded theory. (2013). Colorado State University Writing Guides. Retrieved:

http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=1349
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Postmodern and Family System Theory Approach

Words: 2262 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18147981

Counselling Theories

Postmodern and Family System Theory Approach

There have been significant interest in research on the problems of addiction; hence, the many scientific studies on the issue. Many of the studies in this area end up with the same conclusions; the concept of addiction is complicated. The complexity partly arises from the effect it has on the drug abuser from different perspectives such as psychological, social, biological, and the impacts of addiction on social law, economics and politics. On the other hand, psychologists perceive drug addiction as a disease. From a religious worldview, addiction is a sin. Therefore, it is possible to view addiction from a medical, behavioral, and spiritual angle. As stated, the concept of addiction is complex, and there are many definitions of addiction reflecting the complexity of the phenomenon (Sremac, 2010).

Notably, all the definitions of addiction portray a negative judgment on addiction, but owing to…… [Read More]

References

Caldwell, K., & Claxton, C. (2010). Teaching Family Systems Theory: A Developmental-

Constructivist Perspective. Contemporary Family Therapy, 32(1), 3-21.

Gruber, K.J., & Taylor, M.F. (2006). A Family Perspective for Substance Abuse: Implications

from the Literature. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 6(1), 1 -- 29.
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Treating Mental Illness With a Family Oriented Approach

Words: 1782 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91979540

Family Therapy Treatment of Mental Illness

There has been a growing movement towards the use of family therapy methods for the treatment of mental illness in recent years. To determine the facts about this trend, this paper provides a review of the relevant literature concerning family therapy treatment of mental illness in three sections. In Section 1, a discussion concerning the views of O'Hanlon and owan's (2003) and Zeig and Munion (1999) for working with clients with chronic or severe mental illness is followed by an analysis of the extent to which they succeed in making a strong case for "brief therapy" with intensive clients. An assessment concerning the contribution of Milton Erickson to the assessment and treatment of different mental health diagnoses is followed by an analysis of their respective approaches and the corresponding benefits and limitations of each of these models. Section II provides a discussion concerning the…… [Read More]

References

Daroff, R. B. (2005, Fall). Solution-oriented therapy for chronic and severe mental illness. Journal of Psychotherapy Practice Research, 8(4), 318.

Gurman, A. S. & Messer, S. B. (2003). Essential psychotherapies: Theory and practice. New York: Guilford Press.

McFarlane, W. R., Dixon, L., Lukens, E., & Lucksted, A. (2003): A review of the literature about psychoeducation and schizophrenia. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 29(2), 223-227.

Simoneau, T., & Miklowitz, D. (2001): The sights and sounds of schizophrenia.
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Cognitive Therapy Provides a Structured Framework for

Words: 1239 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76925730

Cognitive therapy provides a structured framework for change. Describe your understanding of how this form of therapy works.

According to Cherry (2012), cognitive behavior therapy, also known as CBT focuses on helping clients to understand the thoughts and feelings that create their behaviors. If such behaviors are problematic, the client is encouraged to work on the way they think and feel about certain situations, which, it is assumed, would then also create change in the behavior. Commonly, phobias, addiction, depression, and anxiety are treated by means of CBT. This type of therapy is generally used to create short-term solutions to very specific problems, which focus on helping people to change by focusing on destructive or disturbing thought patterns that influence their behavior negatively.

The underlying cause for disturbed behaviors is then regarded as thoughts and feelings, more than repressed subconscious disturbances created by the individual's past. As such, these are…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (2012). What is Cognitive Behavior Therapy? Retrieved from: http://psychology.about.com/od/psychotherapy/a/cbt.htm

Haggerty, J. (2006). Psychodynamic Therapy. PsychCentral. Retrieved from: http://psychcentral.com/lib/2006/psychodynamic-therapy/
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Personal Counseling

Words: 2354 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17119225

Counseling

Develop your theoretical orientation to the counseling process and identify how this approach compares to Cognitive Behavioral theory

Since its inception nearly fifty years ago, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) has become recognized as perhaps the most effective therapeutic approach. Indeed, CBT has myriad uses, and is applied in a number of situations, including depression, personality disorders, and wellness and rehabilitation. However, there also exist limitations to cognitive behavioral therapy, mainly surrounding treatment with patients from diverse cultures. This paper develops appropriate therapeutic orientations, discussing different therapeutic concerns and approaches. First, attention is paid to the nature of people; next, the role of the individual in families and other systems is addressed. Then, multicultural considerations, wellness and prevention, and the nature of problems are discussed. Finally, the paper addresses the process of change and how the orientations enacted are successful in practice.

The nature of people

People are diverse, not…… [Read More]

References

Beck, J., & Tompkins, M. (2007). Cognitive therapy. In Handbook of Homework Assignments in Psychotherapy. (pp. 51-63). New York: Springer Science.

Brown, J. (1999). Bowen family systems therapy and practice: Illustration and critique. A.N.J.Z. Family Therapy, 20(2), 94-103.

Lay, K.R., & King, L.J. (2007) Counseling strategies. In Drug Courts: A New Approach to Treatment and Rehabilitation. (pp. 166-182). New York: Springer Science.

Shedler, J. (2010). The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy. American Psychologist, 65(2), 98-109.
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Study of Groups

Words: 2220 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44959057

Groups

The experimental method is usually taken to be the most scientific of all methods, the 'method of choice'. The main problem with all the Psychodynamic Method is lack of control over the situation. The experimental method is a means of trying to overcome this problem. The experiment is sometimes described as the cornerstone of psychology: This is partly due to the central role Experimental method play in many of the physical sciences and also to psychology's historical view of itself as a science. A considerable amount of psychological research uses the experimental method. An experiment is a study of cause and effect. It differs from Psychodynamic Method; in that it involves the deliberate manipulation of one variable, while trying to keep all other variables constant.

Psychodynamic psychology, although still practiced clinically, is not one of the current major approaches to personality psychology. During the 1950's and 1960's, numerous attempts…… [Read More]

References

Margaret Wetherell (Editor) (1996), Identities, Groups and Social Issues, Sage Publications Ltd.

Roger Sapsford (Editor), Arthur Still (Editor), Dorothy Miell (Editor), Richard Stevens (Editor), Margaret Wetherell (Editor) 1998, Theory and Social Psychology (Social Psychology), Sage Publications Ltd.

Bion, W.R. (1961). Experiences in groups. London: Tavistock Publications.

Bion, W.R. (1970). Attention and interpretation. London: Tavistock Publications.
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Dysfunctions and Their Therapies Dysfunctions and Remedies

Words: 1220 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16972289

Dysfunctions and Their Therapies

Dysfunctions and emedies involved

Treatment and Control of Dysfunctions

The Thought Focused Treatment System

The thought focused treatment systems are those which narrow down to thought processes and systems of belief. The system believes in the child developing process being the cause of dysfunction. Social learning and modeling of ideas result to the personalities of an individual. The personalities result to experiences such as thoughts and feelings, critical learning, and the imitation of these behaviors. For instance, the child develops thoughts and behaviors from the parents. If the parents hide their feelings and never cry, the child grows knowing that crying is not the solution. The environment directly affects the child's thoughts. Therefore, if an individual's development is distorted in any manner, there is likely to be an experience of dysfunctional issues or poor health. An individual learns how to cope with stress and problems in…… [Read More]

References

Grohol, J.M. (2004, September 21). Types of Therapies: Theoretical Orientations and Practices of Therapists. Retrieved from  http://psychcentral.com/therapy.htm 

Grohol, J.M. (2011). 15 Common Cognitive Distortions. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/lib/2009/15-common-cognitive-distortions/
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Media Negatively Effects the Body Image Concerns of Adolescent Girls

Words: 1518 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68105579

Media Negatively Affects the Body Image Concerns of Adolescent Girls

Among adolescent girls, body image concerns are not uncommon. The hypothesis of this paper believes that media negatively affects the body image concerns of adolescent girls. The independent variable is the adolescent girls and the dependent variable is the media. This is because adolescent girls can be affected by a lot of other things when it concerns body image, this can come in the form of their peers, society and even history. These variables can affect the concerns on body image of adolescent girls in both a positive and a negative way. However, this paper will only discuss the negative affects which body images are supplied by media to adolescent girls with.

The theoretical approach which best suits this study is the Psychodynamic Approach. This is because the concerns regarding body images are implanted in the minds of these adolescent…… [Read More]

References

Anschutz, D.J., Van Strien, T., & Engels, R.C. (2008). Exposure to Slim Images in Mass Media: Television Commercials as Reminders of Restriction in Restrained Eaters. Health Psychology. 27(4); 401-408.

Cheng, H.L. & Mallinckrodt (2009). Parental Bonds, Anxious Attachment, Media Internalization, and Body Image Dissatisfaction: Exploring a Mediation Model. Journal of Counseling Psychology. 56(5); 365-375.

Clark, L., & Tiggemann, M. (2008). Sociocultural and Individual Psychological Predictors of Body Image in Young Girls: A Prospective Study. Developmental Psychology. 44(4); 1124-1134.

Dohnt, H. & Tiggemann, M. (2006). The Contribution of Peer and Media Influences to the Development of Body Satisfaction and Self-Esteem in Young Girls: A Prospective Study. Developmental Psychology. 42(5); 929-936.
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Counseling Case Study Developmental Issues

Words: 2650 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44860429

In that regard, the counselor would want to explore any possible connection between the social turmoil that might have been responsible for generating his subsequent social disillusionment. To the extent the counselor determines that the subject's social disenfranchisement is attributable to his involvement or response to those social conflicts he would assist the subject evaluate the objective conclusions and expectations that have shaped his outlook as an older adult in substantially different social circumstances and living in a very different society than the one responsible for his feelings about government representatives and authority figures in general (Gerrig & Zimbardo, 2008).

B. Preliminary Hypotheses of Main Apparent Problems

Hypothesis # 1 -- Multiple Causes of Intimacy Issues

First, it is likely that there are multiple concurrent causes of the subject's apparent difficulty establishing and maintaining close intimate relationships and effective communications within his marriage. The psychodynamic perspective teaches that it is…… [Read More]

References

Adler, a. (1927) Understanding Human Nature. Center City: Hazelden

Frain, M.P., Bishop, M., and Bethel, M. "A Roadmap for Rehabilitation Counseling to Serve Military Veterans with Disabilities." Journal of Rehabilitation, Volume 76,

No. 1; (2010): 13-21.

Gerrig, R, and Zimbardo, P. (2008). Psychology and Life.. New York: Allyn & Bacon.
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Theories of Personality and How They Affect Human Behavior

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8462817

psychology, theories of personality abound. Two of the most significant theories of personality include psychodynamic and humanistic/existential theories. Although these two theories share some features in common, they are based on widely different assumptions about human nature and human behavior. Each describes the way personality impacts human behavior under certain situations. However, psychodynamic theory presumes that human personality is static and less likely to change. Humanistic and existential theories are built on the assumption that human personality is dynamic. The differences between psychodynamic and humanistic theories of personality also have an impact on their approaches to treatment interventions and therapy.

Psychodynamic theories of personality are based on the theories of Sigmund Freud, who believed that human personality is determined by subconscious factors and the person's psycho-sexual nature. The personality is divided into three main and immutable components according to the psychodynamic worldview. Those three components include the id, ego, and…… [Read More]

References

"A Comparison of Psychodynamic and Humanistic Therapy," (2015). Retrieved online: http://sulcatamandy.hubpages.com/hub/psychodynamic-therapy-vs.-humanistic-therapy

"Humanistic Theories of Personality," (n.d.). Retrieved online: http://home2.fvcc.edu/~rhalvers/psych/Personality3.htm

McLeod, S. (2007). Psychodynamic approach. Simply Psychology. Retrieved online: http://www.simplypsychology.org/psychodynamic.html
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Ccrt Method as Used to Analyze the

Words: 566 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3791956

CCT method, as used to analyze the case of Ms. A would proceed as follows:

P: Boyfriend does not pay enough attention to Ms. A.

W: Ms. A wants to be accepted and to receive assurance of unconditional love from her boyfriend.

O: The boyfriend withdraws from her advances and becomes even more distant as Ms. A becomes more demanding.

This pattern has occurred and reoccurred in the patient's life. According to Kassaw and Gabbard, the therapist must be on guard that a similar relationship pattern is not recreated with the therapist (in other words, the woman might be very needy and demanding of the therapist's attention to the point of unreasonableness, then break off the therapeutic relationship if the therapist is not 'there for her.')

The patient's insecurity, according to the psychodynamic approach to therapy, will continue to manifest itself again and again in Ms. A's romantic relationships. However,…… [Read More]

Reference

Kassaw, K. & Gabbard, G. (2002). Creating a psychodynamic formulation from a clinical evaluation. Am J. Psychiatry, 159:5: 721-726.
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Industrial and Organizational Psychology Shares Much in

Words: 598 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54217725

Industrial and Organizational Psychology shares much in common with several related fields, and there are multiple professional partnership opportunities. The field most closely linked to industrial and organizational psychology, and one that is important to my personal career development, is going to be human resources. As Cascio & Silbey (1979) point out, assessment centers have transformed the nature of human resources and the candidate selection process, helping organizations make more educated decisions about crafting the ideal organizational culture. Likewise, Murphy, Dzieweczynski & Yang (2009) show how the field of psychology, and organizational psychology in particular, has contributed to the evolution of assessment measures used at every stage of the human resources process from initial intakes and screening for candidates to ongoing assessments and evaluations. In this sense, human resources depend on organizational and industrial psychology.

The field of industrial and organizational psychology adds complexity to the human resources selection process,…… [Read More]

References

Cascio, W. & Silbey, V. (1979). Utility of the assessment center as a selection device. Journal of Applied Psychology, 64(2), 107-118. (EBSCOhost Accession

Number: AN 5112753).

Murphy, K., Dzieweczynski, J., & Yang, Z. (2009). Positive manifold limits the relevance of content-matching strategies for validating selection test batteries. Journal of Applied Psychology, 94(4), 1018-1031. (EBSCOhost Accession Number: AN apl-94-4-1018).

Prins, S. (2006). The psychodynamic perspective in organizational research: Making sense of the dynamics of direction setting in emergent collaborative processes. Journal of Occupational & Organizational Psychology, 79(3), 335-355. (EBSCOhost Accession Number: AN 22557999).
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Supervisory Procedures for Mental Health

Words: 1850 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59097137

This is when there will be a focused approach that is seeking out the best tools for addressing a host of issues.

Conclusion

Clearly, the field of mental health is continually changing. Part of the reason for this, is because there is emphasis on identifying new techniques for effectively treating patients. This has created a transformation in what kind of tools that are being used to address these issues. At the same time, there has been a focus on implementing supervisory procedures that will have an impact on kinds of treatment options that are being provided. This is important, because these kinds of transformations mean that they are providing effective support to mental health professionals in dealing with these issues. Once this occurs, is when there will be an emphasis on how psychologists are interacting with: patients, colleagues and supervisors. As this approach, is based upon respect, understanding, compassion and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Clinical Supervision. (2009). Health. Retrieved from: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/qcmhl/src/superguide_2009.pdf

Bernard, J.M., & Goodyear, R.K. (2009). Fundamentals of clinical supervision. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Brown, L. (2008). The New Handbook of Counseling Supervision. Mahwah, NJ: Taylor and Francis.

Campbell, J. (2006). Essentials of clinical supervision. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
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Supervision Portfolio Personal Philosophy and Supervision Forms

Words: 2593 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37659791

The experience I had accumulated in my secondary days as a supervisor in mathematics also assists me in my place of work.

I also had experience as a supervisor in my workplace, which enhanced my development level as a supervisor. My development level as a supervisor also continues in my workplace before getting admission into the university. Before I got admission in into the university, I had worked in series of companies notably manufacturing companies. For example, I worked with Toyota Company for 5 years as an assistant supervisor. My working experience in the company has assisted my development level as a supervisor. In my working experience, I understand that it is critical for a supervisor to build working relationships with supervisees. Typically, supervisory-supervisees relationships enhance mutual alliance between the two parties. The supervisor and supervisees share responsibility of developing empathy, genuineness, warmth, emotional and reliability engagement to develop key…… [Read More]

References

Arthur, M.E. (2012). Application of the Discrimination Model of Supervision for Residency Education, Annals of Behavioral Science and Medical Education,18 (1):32-37.

Bernard, J.M. (1979). Supervisor training: A discrimination model. Counselor Education and Supervision, 19, 60-68.

Bernard, J.M., Goodyear, R.K. (1992). Fundamentals of clinical supervision. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Bernard, J.M., & Goodyear, R.K. (2009).Fundamentals of clinical supervision, (4th Edition). Columbus, OH: Merrill.
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Psychological Counseling Interview Counselor Tom

Words: 4270 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81626687

Okay?

Client: Thank you Christina, I look forward to seeing you next week.

Zal (1990, p. 136) states that it can indeed be a very fragile and emotionally battered individual that comes to your office for evaluation. An adequate treatment plan for panic disorder must therefore comprise many specific aspects. The first of course is to make the diagnosis and share it confidently and directly with the patient. As the first person to encounter the patient with some understanding of his or her symptoms, you are in a unique position to do an enormous therapeutic service by giving them a clear, precise definition of their illness and once and for all showing them that their symptoms have meaning. Let them know that it is only since 1980 that panic disorder has a name and that it is only during this decade that even psychiatry is beginning to understand this malady.…… [Read More]

References www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100339937

Austrian, S.G. (2000). Mental Disorders, Medications, and Clinical Social Work. New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100339938 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85908719

Barber, J.P. & Crits-Christoph, P. (Eds.). (1995). Dynamic Therapies for Psychiatric Disorders: Axis I. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85908721 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6960620

Beck, A.T., Emery, G., & Greenberg, R.L. (1985). Anxiety Disorders and Phobias A Cognitive Perspective. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6960620 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8992037

Craske, M.G. (1999). Anxiety Disorders: Psychological Approaches to Theory and Treatment. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8992037 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85933111
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Personal Leadership Platform

Words: 1641 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25475201

Personal Leadership Platform

Henry Fayol, Mary Parker among other scholars in the field of management have described leadership as the act of getting thing done through others, this definition is consistent with the definition given by Carter et al. (2008, 3-4) who described leadership as the process of attaining organizational goals, of which these organizational goals are attained effectively and efficiently through the performance of certain tasks that includes planning, organizing staffing, directing and controlling. From a functional perspective leadership can be defined as the process of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling organizational resources and activities so that goals can be accomplished effectively and efficiently.

This research paper is based on leadership development from a personal perspective i.e. It aims at enlisting my strengths and weaknesses as a leader and the corrective measures I plan to undertake in order to become the future leader that I would admire.- Besides…… [Read More]

Work cited

Avolio, B.J., Gardner, W.L., Walumbwa, F.O., Luthans, F., & May, D. (2004).

Unlocking the mask: A look at the process by which authentic leader's impact follower attitudes and behaviors. The Leadership Quarterly, 15, 801-823.

Carter Louis L., Marshall Goldsmith, and David Ulrich (2008) Best Practices in Leadership Development and Organization Change, Best Practice Institute.

Cromwell S. And Kolb J. (2004), "An examination of work-environment support factors affecting transfer of supervisory skills training to the work place," Human Resource Development Quarterly
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Cognitive Psychology Essay

Words: 2882 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

This essay discusses cognitive psychology and a specific scenario within that scientific term. It starts out with an introduction or definition of cognitive psychology, then discusses a specific scenario, and perspectives of the scenario. The body of this essay covers treatments, therapies, and interventions for the scenario, as well as effectiveness of therapies, before summing up the paper with a conclusion.
Titles:
Cognitive Psychology: Modern Approach to Human Behavior

Cognitive Psychology Advancements
Topics:
Introduction to Applied Cognitive Psychology

Cognitive Psychology of Planning
Outline:
I. Introduction

II. Body
A. Scenario
B. Psychological Perspectives
C. Treatment, Therapies, Interventions
D. Effectiveness of Therapies
III. Conclusion
Title: Cognitive Psychology Scenario Essay

Introduction
Cognitive psychology is a relatively new or modern approach to human behavior whose main focus is how people think. This approach in psychology focuses on how people think because of the belief that thought processes affect peoples behaviors. In essence, an individuals…… [Read More]

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Psychology - History of Psychology

Words: 1415 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59949647



Whereas the behaviorist and psychodynamic models contradict each other in their fundamental assumptions and focus, humanistic perspective does not necessarily contradict behaviorism or the psychodynamic approach, except that it considers both of those views as explanations of only portions of human behavior rather than all human behavior.

The Cognitive Perspective:

The Cognitive perspective broadens the study of human psychology even further than the humanistic perspective. In addition to considering all of the influential elements within the behaviorist, psychodynamic, and humanistic views, cognitive psychology also studies the combined contributions of knowledge, memory, previous experience, subconscious desires, external factors, and volitional thought on external behavior (Gerrig & Zimbardo 2005).

Cognitive psychology accepts many of the fundamental concepts of other schools of psychological thought, and much like the humanistic point-of-view, merely considers them incomplete explanations of human behavior rather than oppositional theories.

According to cognitive psychologists, even the most inclusive theories like humanistic…… [Read More]

REFERENCES Coleman, J.C., Butcher, J.N., Carson, R.C. (1984) Abnormal Psychology and Human Life. Dallas: Scott, Foresman & Co. Gerrig, R, Zimbardo, P. (2005) Psychology and Life. 17th Edition.

New York: Allyn & Bacon.
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Sigmund Freud to the Science

Words: 2064 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65632482

In this regard, Demorest concludes that, "Together these and other theorists have provided accounts of what it means to be a person that all fit within the psychodynamic paradigm, a perspective that holds a vision of people as at their core driven by dynamic forces in their unconscious minds" (2005, p. 3).

Freud's influence on psychoanalytic thought, though, required some time to take hold and many of his methods were rejected outright by the contemporary medical establishment, particularly in the United States. For example, following Freud's only trip to North America in 1909, one psychiatrist believed that, "Many patients were psychotically disturbed and deemed to be beyond the reach of Freud's intellectual 'talk therapy'" (Beam, 2001, p. 94). Not only did others think that Freud's methods were not appropriate for some patients, Freud himself acknowledged their limitations. In fact, Beam points out as well that, "Freud himself thought most schizophrenics…… [Read More]

References

Beam, A. (2001). Gracefully insane: The rise and fall of America's premier mental hospital.

New York: Public Affairs.

Cherry, K. (2010). Freud's patients and therapy. About.com: Psychology. Retrieved from http://psychology.about.com/od/sigmundfreud/ig/Sigmund-Freud-Photobiography/Freud-s-Patients-and-Therapy.htm.

Demorest, A. (2005). Psychology's grand theorists: How personal experiences shaped professional ideas. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Traditional and Contemporary Psychodynamics Theories

Words: 872 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17550491

Tenets of Traditional and Contemporary Psychodynamics

Traditional Psychodynamics

One of the founders of traditional psychodynamics is Sigmund Freud with his approach of psychoanalytic theory with which he attempted to explain the behavior of human beings by looking at the mind and the inner thinking process of individuals, right from the time of birth. Due to his work, Freud influenced several other scholars in the line of psychology who later on came up with various arguments around the mind and the aspects that influence human behavior. Firstly and significant here, the traditional psychodynamic theory argues that there are psychological energy within the individual that are related to the attachments, continuous conflict and the motivations that the individual has. The theory further indicates that the behavior of an individual at the adulthood is widely influenced by the early childhood experiences.

The traditional psychodynamics also gave an indication that the psychological development took…… [Read More]

Reference

Cherry K., (2015).Trait Theory of Personality. Retrieved July 11, 2015 from http://psychology.about.com/od/theoriesofpersonality/a/trait-theory.htm

Mullen W., (1996). Study Challenges Freud's Theory of Subconscious. Chicago Tribune. http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1996-09-20/news/9609200240_1_subliminal-messages-popcorn-sales-anthony-greenwald

Sage Publications, (2008).Psychoanalysis in Theory and Practice. Retrieved July 11, 2015 from http://www.sagepub.com/sites/default/files/upm-binaries/23240_Chapter_5.pdf
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Psychotherapies if Rape Were Legal This Is

Words: 1296 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10364136

Psychotherapies

If ape were legal

This is a story about a cancer patient who objectifies women and his life changes drastically for the better after his therapist takes an aggressive stance in one of the personal therapy sessions after a disturbing incident in his group therapy session. This paper reviews the relationship between the patient and the therapist by analyzing their dynamic through the following psychotherapies: Dynamic, Person-Centered, EBT and Alderian.

Dynamic

Psychodynamic psychologists research human habits by trying to find the unseen meanings in things that individuals think, do or state. This needs them to collect huge quantities of qualitative information about individuals, which is typically done with using the specific case-study technique. The topic of the case history is typically an individual who is dealing with a mental ailment and who is being treated with psychoanalysis. The professional gathers details from things the individual states or finishes treatment…… [Read More]

References

Gergen, K.J. (1999). An invitation to social construction. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Korobov, N. (2000). Social constructionist 'theory hope': The impasse from theory to practice. Culture and Psychology, 6, 365-373.

Martin, J., & Sugarman, J. (1997). The social-cognitive construction of psychotherapeutic change: Bridging social constructionism and cognitive constructivism. Review of General Psychology, 1, 375-378.

Sammons, A. (2007). Psychodynamic approach: the basics. Psychodynamic Psychology.
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Abnormal Psych in Media Disorganized

Words: 2856 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7654120

This confusion would have been intolerable for him, creating disorganized patterns of thought. Out of this disorganization developed delusion. The boy came to imagine that the father killed the mother.

Another way cognitive (and psychodynamic) approaches explain the genesis of schizophrenia is by reference to childhood trauma. Things such as abuse, divorce, a domineering mother, or witnessing murder are seen as major factors in schizophrenic development (Koehler & Silver, 2009, p. 225). Traumatic events lead to dissociation from parents and from reality. Other related factors are stress, fear, anxiety, and social isolation that lead to schizophrenia. In other words, it is how the person is embedded in extreme and dysfunctional social relations that may shape their development. Here Spider's malady would be discussed in terms of intense family strife. There is evidence for severe marital tension in the film, exemplified by the man's having an affair. Combined with poor family…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.). Washington, DC: author.

Beck, A.T., Rector, N.A., Stolar, N., & Grant, P. (2009). Schizophrenia: Cognitive theory, research, and therapy. New York: Guilford Press.

Bellack, A.S., Mueser, K.T., Gingerich, S., & Agresta, J. (1997). Social skills training for schizophrenia: A step-by-step guide. New York: Guilford Press.

Chavez, M.G. (2009). Group psychotherapy and schizophrenia. In Psychotherapeutic approaches to schizophrenic psychoses: Past, present and future, eds Y.O. Alanen, M.G. Chavez, A.-L. Silver, & B. Martindale, pp. 251-266. London: Routledge.
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IQ Discrimination the Concept of General Ability

Words: 3541 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22745648

IQ Discrimination

The concept of general ability or intelligence has in the past been the most important single way of accounting for individual differences. IQ (Intelligence quotient) is usually assessed by measuring performances on a test of a number of different skills, using tasks that emphasize reasoning and problem solving in a number of different areas. Early assessments of IQ were done in France by Alfred Binet in 1905, as part of an attempt to identify children who needed specialist help to make educational progress. Interest in IQ testing continued in the U.S. By researchers such as Louis Terman.

IQ was thought to be fixed in these early years and so was often used in education in an attempt to predict children's future academic progress with different levels of measured intelligence being taken to imply the need for different forms of educational experiences. More able children are supposed to need…… [Read More]

References.

Bates, Steve. (2002). Personality counts: psychological tests can help peg the job applicants best suited for certain jobs. HR Magazine. Feb. 2002

Flynn, Gillian. (2002). A legal examination of testing. Workforce. June 2002

Newitz, Annalee. (2000). The personality paradox. Industry Stand. October, 2000.
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Interview Was Conducted With Mrs

Words: 1405 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76165485



Her improvement as a now member of the American society and capacity to become integrated in this new society became her goal of life. Before proceeding to accomplish her goals, she told us that she had an evaluation of herself and decided that none of the fundamental values of herself as an individual had changed. he was still extremely intelligent, was still an excellent surgeon, even if she could not practice it at the current time (this did not change the intrinsic value of herself as a surgeon or as a physician, determined by her knowledge, not by her position in society) and had the capacity to activate all these latent qualities. he mobilized herself so as to reach all the objectives she had proposed for herself.

Once on the top of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, Mrs. Ionescu found herself somewhere on the third level, needing both acceptance as an…… [Read More]

Subsequently, she changed her thoughts from the generally negative ones in the beginning of her stay to positive ones, better adapted to the dream that she wanted to fulfil. As such, she was able to approach her colleagues at work, develop a social life outside the hospital etc.

Mrs. Ionescu is currently a surgeon in the same hospital, a remarkable physician, a fully appreciated member of society and of the medical community. The interview revealed the underlying, fundamental traits and characteristics of her personality. We can conclude that her personality is a dynamic one that has evolved from the moment of her initial arrival in the U.S., when she felt insecure, pessimistic, melancholic, to the current state, where she is confident in her forces, able to face any challenge, sanguine and optimistic.

Heffner, Christopher. Personality Synopsis. August 2002. Chapter 5
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Freud and the Case of

Words: 527 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73792138

cared.

With Freud's help, Lucy R. eventually came to the realization that her employer did not care for her in the same way that she cared for him. Eventually, she recovered from most of her symptoms. During her recovery, she also experienced elements of the psychodynamic transference that Freud described in his writings. In general, Freud's transference principle typically accounts for the romantic feelings or sexual desires that patients undergoing psychotherapy often experience for their therapists. In the specific case of Lucy R., that transference manifested itself in her replacing her olfactory hallucinations of burnt pudding for the imagined odor of burning cigars. Freud frequently smoked cigars during his sessions and also described other similar transference experience having to do with his female patients and his cigars in that regard.

Conclusion

The case of Lucy R. illustrates the classic Freudian concepts of psychological repression of unpleasant thoughts or of thoughts…… [Read More]

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Role of a Group Counselor Group Psychology

Words: 1975 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15306305

mental health clinic is understaffed and counselors decide to use group work to deal with more clients during a particular period of time. The counselor organizes a group and asks for candidates from colleagues and places a message on the clinic's bulletin board. However, the incoming members are not prepared, and the announcements fail to inform them about the purposes and goals of the group, the background and qualification of the leader, the expectations of the group and the techniques that will be used. Consequently, the receptionist admits the first 12 people who sign up or call regardless of the nature of their problems. During the first meeting, one depressed and suicidal member takes up the entire session and the important matters are not discussed. The intensity of the client's crisis also scared some of the members and they fail to return for the next session.

How to screen more…… [Read More]

References

Berg, R.C., Landreth, G.L. & Fall, K.A. (2013). Group Counseling: Concepts and Procedures. (5th Ed.) New York, NY: Taylor & Francis Ltd.

Corey, G. (2013). Case Approach to Counseling and Psychotherapy. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning

Corey, M., Corey, G. & Corey, C. (2008). Groups: Process and Practice. (8th Ed.). Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning

Weimels, L. (2014). Group Dynamics: How to Successfully Work in Groups. Retrieved 23 July 2015 from http://www.naspa.org/constituent-groups/posts/group-dynamics-how-to-successfully-work-in-groups
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Schizophrenia John Nash John Nash

Words: 1613 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71389348

In addition, they both realize that stress can make his condition worse, and work to reduce stress on him. That would also be an important part of his treatment today. In the movie, it may have helped Nash that his imaginary "controller" wanted him to do things he could not agree with, such has harming his wife "because she knew too much." In the movie, the little girl appears and holds his hand, and then it dawns on him -- the little girl never ages. She can't be real. The controller can't be real. It is hard to know whether these events really happened in this way; his story is presented as a movie, and Nash's perceptions may have altered even the events that help him resist the draw of his hallucinations.

John Nash's story demonstrates also that hallucinations serve a purpose for the patient's personality. As a secret code…… [Read More]

Bower, Bruce. 1996. "The birth of schizophrenia: a debilitating mental disorder may take root in the fetal brain." Science News, May 29.

Humphrey-Beebe, Lora. 2003. "Theory-based research in Schizophrenia." Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, April.

Thompson, Paul, Ph.D. 2002. "Brain Deficit Patterns May Signal Early-Onset Schizophrenia." Psychiatric Times, August. (Thompson, 2002)
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Leslie Bennetts 2007 Vents Her Rage on

Words: 1274 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34713492

Leslie Bennetts (2007) vents her rage on the system that compels mothers to stay home and forgo career dreams and opportunities of higher wage in order to care for their children. he also seethes at women who turn their anger and embitterment inwards instead of directing it outwards at a callous and unjust system.

I think that Bennetts (2007) has a point, but I also find her conclusions to be too categorical and it seems to me that she may be too generic in her fault-blaming. Ironically she herself may be evidencing the same fault that she accuses her targets of portraying, namely insufficient understanding and empathy of the other.

Bennetts writes that:

tressed and resentful, the majority of women nonetheless continue to work, many out of financial necessity. Others quit their jobs to stay home, although the price may include conflicted feelings about having had to make such a…… [Read More]

Source

Bennetts, L. (May 13, 2007) A Mother's Day kiss-off. Los Angeles Times

 http://articles.latimes.com/2007/may/13/opinion/op-bennetts13
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Bruner's Constructivist Theory and the Conceptual Paradigms

Words: 3441 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3905232

Bune's constuctivist theoy and the conceptual paadigms of Kolb's Expeiential Leaning theoy dawing on the associated theoies ae Kinesthetic and Embodied Leaning. As also noted in the intoductoy chapte, the guiding eseach question fo this study was, "What ae the caee paths fo teaching atists seeking to deploy into the field of community at and development?" To develop timely and infomed answes to this eseach question, this chapte povides a eview of the elevant pee-eviewed and scholaly liteatue concening these theoetical famewoks to investigate the diffeent caee paths teaching atists seek to deploy into the field of community at and development, including ceative community building and adult community centes such as woking with Alzheime's Disease and stoke victims.

Adult Leaning Theoies

Kolb's Expeiential Leaning Theoy. Thee ae a wide aay of theoetical models that can be used to identify and bette undestand teaching and leaning pefeences by educatos and students,…… [Read More]

references to improve coaching and athletic performance: Are your players or students kinesthetic learners? The Journal of Physical

Education, Recreation & Dance, 80(3), 30-34.

Fowler, J. (2013, March). Art rescue in a troubled world. Arts & Activities, 153(2), 36-39.

Kerka, S. (2002). Somatic/embodied learning and adult education: Trends and issues alert. ERIC

Kessler, R. (2000). The soul of education: Helping students find connection, compassion, and character at school. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum
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Theoretical Views on Leadership Applied

Words: 3640 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78677468

ill Gates is perhaps a good example in this sense: Microsoft during the early 70s was but a mixture of their programmers, but they selected ill Gates to coordinate and organize their efforts because they saw him as the best prepared among them. This is also what named him chief software architect at Microsoft (besides the fact that he owned the company at that point) and he retained the respective function even after he was no longer CEO.

There are other particularities of leadership in the software development industry as well.

ecause the work activity is based on the existence of development teams that generally incorporate developers, testers and writers and which are led by a team leader or project manager, there is a distinctive importance attributed to the project manager or team leader. His or her job is many folded, which means that he probably needs to have all…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Spencer, Emily. Leadership Models and Theories: A Brief Overview. On the Internet at http://www.cda-acd.forces.gc.ca/cfli/engraph/research/pdf/12.pdf.Last retrieved on August 10, 2008

2. Models and Theories. On the Internet at http://www.stewart-associates.co.uk/leadership-models.aspx.Last retrieved on August 10, 2008

3. P.G. Northouse, Leadership: Theory and Practice, (Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 1997

4. G. Yukl, Leadership in Organizations, 4th Edition, (New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Inc., 1998
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ASD Case Kyle Is a 40-Year-Old Male

Words: 1297 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13778065

ASD Case

Kyle is a 40-year-old male of Greek-American descent. He reports that his religion is Eastern-Orthodox and he attends weekly services. Kyle's wife urged him to contact a therapist because she was concerned about some recent and radical changes in his behavior. As a reservist in the U.S. Marines, Kyle has been deployed twice to serve in Iraq. During his first deployment, he was stationed in Kuwait and had an uneventful service. However, his second deployment was marked by a significant tragic event. During a weekend leave just before he was sent back to the United States Kyle was exploring a rural marketplace with several military colleagues. A bomb detonated at the market, killing several dozen local civilians, and one of Kyle's colleagues. Kyle, who was not hurt in the blast, heroically assisted both his colleagues and many of the civilians who were critically wounded.

Since returning home two…… [Read More]

References

American Counseling Association (2005). ACA code of ethics. Retrieved on May 15, 2012 from http://www.counseling.org/Files/FD.ashx?guid=ab7c1272-71c4-46cf- 848c-f98489937dda.

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.-text revision). Washington, DC: Author.

Cashwell, C.S., Looby, E.J., & Housley, W. (1997). Appreciating cultural diversity through clinical supervision. The Clinical Supervisor, 15, 75-85.

Cloitre, M. (2009). Effective psychotherapies for posttraumatic stress disorder: A review and critique. CNS Spectrums, 14(1), S1, 32-43.
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Developmental Theories

Words: 1075 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99069675

Developmental Theories

Limitations of Great Theories

The psychoanalytic theory (Saul Mcleod, 2007)

ejection of the free will

Lack of scientific support

Samples were biased. For instance, only Austrian women were considered in proving the theory

Case studies were subjective

Cognitive Theory (Saul Mcleod, Cognitive Psychology, 2007)

Does not consider biology

The section on humanism dismisses scientific approaches

The ecological validity of the experiments is low

There is subjective introspection

Behavioral Theory (Saul Mcleod, Cognitive Psychology, 2007)

It is misplaced to compare humans and animals

It ignores the role of biology such as testosterone effects

There is little free will

Dismisses meditational process

The Surprises from Harlow's experiments

Harlow noted that that the existence of systems of affection that could fill in the gap for each other was sensible; from evolutionary standpoint. Indeed, compensations that were reciprocal presented a higher chance of social survival. According to Marga Vicedo (2010), diverse affectional…… [Read More]

References

Jake Edwards. (2009, Febraury 17). New Criticism. Retrieved from Reading Theory with Jolliffe:  http://jolliffereadingtheory.blogspot.in/ 

KESSENICH, MAUREEN, MORRISON, FREDERICK J, & BISANZ, JEFFREY. (2002). Developmental Theory. The Gale Group Inc.

Marga Vicedo. (2010). The evolution of Harry Harlow: from the nature to the nurture of love. History of Psychiatry, 1-16.

Saul Mcleod. (2007). Psychodynamic Approach. Simplypsychology.
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Unconscious Determinants of Personality

Words: 847 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58322961

Psychological Influences on Personality Development

ecognizing Various Unconscious Behavioral Determinants

Contemporary psychologists understand that myriad influences of variable origin contribute to the development of human personality. Some of those influences are more apparent than others and some operate on the conscious level whereas others operate on a completely unconscious level. Naturally, the latter present more complex potential issues simply because they are not known to the individual. That is especially true with regard to aspects of personality whose roots go back to infancy but that only become manifest in behavior only much later.

Different psychological theorists have provided conflicting explanations for the origin of major issues in human personality development. Freud, for example, regarded virtually all manifestations of psychological pathology as being the result of early trauma, sexual impulses, and the failure to successfully negotiate specific stages of infancy, such as the oral stage, anal stage, and the Oedipal stage.…… [Read More]

References

Bretherton, I. "The Origins of Attachment Theory: John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth

Developmental Psychology, Vol. 28 (1992): 759-775. Accessed Online:

Http://Www.Psychology.Sunysb.Edu/Attachment/Online/Inge_Origins.Pdf

Byng-Hall, J. "Creating a Secure Family Base: Some Implications of Attachment Theory
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Racial Identity Complexities and Potential in Cross-Cultural

Words: 3485 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15192106

acial Identity

Complexities and Potential in Cross-Cultural Counseling

In 1897 the French sociologist Emile Durkheim wrote about the influence of culture on suicide rates among different groups. He found that while suicide seems to be the most private and most individualistic choice that a person can make (what could be more private than the dialogue that an individual has with eternity, after all) cultural values still hold sway. His research has been criticized over the decades, but its central point remains valid. Culture seeps into every level of both our conscious and unconscious behaviors, and therefore must be attended to in every aspect of the therapeutic process. However, while at least most therapists as well as most of those individuals studying to become therapists are certainly aware of this fact, this awareness does not necessarily translate into sufficient care taken to minimize the harm that cross-cultural misunderstandings or blindnesses that…… [Read More]

References

Bimrose, J. (1996). Multiculturalism, in Bayne, R., Horton, I. & Bimrose, J. (Eds.) New directions in counseling. London: Routledge.

Fouad, N. et al. (2012). Qualitative study of the dislocated working class. Journal of career development 39, 287-310.

LaFromboise, T., Trimble, J., & Mohatt, G. (1990). Counseling intervention and American Indian tradition: An integrative approach.The counseling psychologist 18(4), 628-654.

Jones, A.C. (1985). Psychological functioning in black Americans: A conceptual guide for use in psychotherapy. Psychotherapy 22 (2), 363-369.
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Transference and Love

Words: 4117 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50265210

transference and transference love, as it is manifest in the psychoanalytic environment. Different therapists have recommended different methods of dealing with this love, which range from simple, knowing transference to idealized transference, and erotic transference. These range from exploring such issues verbally, to the use of surrogates for sex therapy, to sexual involvement with patients. Certain factions within the therapeutic community advocate some or none of these methodologies.

Answering his own question, "What are transferences?" he wrote: "A whole series of psychological experiences are revived, not as belonging to the past, but as belonging to the person of the physician at the present moment.... Psychoanalytic treatment does not create transferences, it merely brings them to light.... Transference, which seems ordained to be the greatest obstacle to psychoanalysis, becomes its most powerful ally if its presence can be detected each time and explained to the person" (1895:116-120). Freud went on to…… [Read More]

References

Winnicott, D.W. (1960). "Countertransference." British Journal of Medical Psychology, 33, 17-21.

Balint, M. (1965). Primary love and psychoanalytic technique. London: Tavistock.

Reich, A. (1951). "On countertransference." International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 32, 25-31.

Loewenstein, R.M. (1969). "Developments in the theory of transference in the last fifty years." International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 50, 583-588.
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dreams the unconscious mind and defense mechanisms

Words: 2116 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54763749

Psychodynamic and Psychoanalytic theory suggest that early stages of human development have a significant impact on our relationships and our ego throughout the life span. According to Freudian theories, manifested behavior is based on latent problems of the past. The therapeutic process of psychoanalysis is designed to help the client become aware of past problems or latent desires that have been suppressed during the process of psychological development. Key themes that emerge in the literature on psychoanalytic theory include the role of the unconscious mind in shaping self-concept and behavior, dreams as the language of the unconscious mind, and the development of ego defense mechanisms as psychological coping mechanisms.

Dream analysis is one of the hallmarks of Freudian theory and central to psychoanalysis. In this article, Hebbrecht (2013) presents several case studies from clinical practice to illustrate some of the ways dream recollection can be stimulated during therapy, and how…… [Read More]

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Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

Words: 2290 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71659198

Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

Psychodynamic and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

In this paper, there is going to an examination of Cognitive Behavioral and Psychodynamic theories. This is accomplished by focusing on: the two theories, their theoretical concepts, micro skills / techniques and a summary of these ideas. These elements will show how each one can address issues impacting the patient and the long-term effects upon them.

In the world of psychology, there are different theories which are used to explain how someone reacts to various stimuli. The result is that there has been contrasting ideas about the best way to understand human behavior. Two schools of thought which are very popular are the psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral approaches. (Okun, 2008)

To fully understand them requires examining each one. This will be accomplished by focusing on the two theories, their theoretical concepts, micro skills / techniques and a summary of these…… [Read More]

References

Larson, P. (2012). How Important is an Understanding of the Clients Early Attachments. Counseling Psychology Review, 27 (1), 10 -- 18.

Lucia, M. (2012). Therapeutic Activities and Psychological Interventions. Counseling and Psychotherapy Research, 12 (2), 118 -- 127.

Okun, B. (2008). Effective Helping: Interviewing and Counseling Techniques. New York, NY: Brooks and Cole.

Parpottis, P. (2012). Working with the Therapeutic Relationship. Counseling Psychology Review, 27 (3), 91-97
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Analyzing Yalom's if Rape Were Legal

Words: 1541 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13288052

Psychoanalysis

The opening phase of dynamic psychotherapy helps the therapist to understand why the patient is seeking treatment; what kind of triggers to current problems are present; and house troubled the patient is in terms of both physical and psychological health (text p. 41). Yalom (1989) allows for several sessions of introductory therapy, also in keeping with the psychodynamic model. At this introductory phase, the therapist gets an idea of what treatment options to present and how to proceed. Yalom (1989) also determines the frequency of the treatment in the introductory phase (text p. 41). The core way that the relationship between Yalom (1989) and Carlos exemplifies psychodynamic therapy is in regards to the transference neurosis, which intensifies in therapy (text p. 53). However, transference is worked through as a core element of the therapeutic process. In the case with Carlos, neurotic transference is exemplified most clearly in the way…… [Read More]

References

Corsini & Wedding (n.d.). Textbook.

Yalom (1989), I.D. (1989). "2 - If Rape Were Legal..." In Love's Executioner and Other Tales of Psychotherapy. New York: Basic, 1989. 59-78.